"Lieutenant Gustl" (1900) by Arthur Schnitzler

(actualisé le ) by Arthur Schnitzler

A long, intense and dramatic "stream-of-consciousness" mental monologue [1] of of an officer in pre-WW1 Vienna before, during and after a dramatic incident in an opera house that neither he nor the reader can ever forget.

A brilliant portrayal of the military mindset in the country that started the First World War [2].

By Arthur Schnitzler (1862-1931), doctor, playwright, novelist and one of the most renowned German-language short-story writers of the 20th century.

Translated specially for this site [3]. (12,500 words)


e-books, with the original text in an annex, are available for downloading below.

The original text – and a portrait of the author – can also be seen here.



 [4]


LIEUTENANT GUSTL

How long is this going to go on for? I have to look at my watch… that probably wouldn’t be very elegant in such a serious concert. But who would be looking? If someone saw me do it, they’d pay as little attention as I would, and I don’t have to worry about them… only a quarter to ten?… I seem to have been sitting in this concert hall for three hours already. I’m not at all used to it… What is it exactly? I have to look at the programme… Oh, I see, an oratorio! I would have thought it was a mass. Such things belong only in churches! What’s good about a church is that you can leave at any time. If at least I’d had a corner seat! Well, patience, patience – even oratorios come to an end at some point. Perhaps it’s very nice, and I’m just not in the mood. Why should I be in the mood? When I think that I came here to have a good time… I should have sent the ticket to Benedek, he likes this sort of thing – he plays the violin himself. But that would have offended Kopetzky. It was certainly very nice of him, at least it was well meant. A good fellow, Kopetzky! The only one you can really count on… His sister’s singing with the others up there. At least a hundred young women, all dressed in black; how can you distinguish her among them all? Kopetzky got the ticket because she was singing in the choir… Why didn’t he come himself? They’re singing moreover very nicely. It’s really most uplifting – really! Bravo! Bravo! Yes, let’s join in the applause. The fellow next to me is clapping like a madman. Did it really please him that much? The girl over there in the lodge is very cute. Is she looking at me or at the fellow with the blond beard?… Ah, a solo! Who is it? Contralto: Miss Walker, soprano: Miss Michalek… that’s probably the soprano… I haven’t been in the opera for a long time. In the opera I always enjoy myself, even when it’s long-winded. In fact I could come back again the day after tomorrow for “Traviata”. But the day after tomorrow I may very well be a corpse! Oh, nonsense, I don’t even believe that myself! Just you wait doctor, I’ll teach you to make such remarks! I’ll cut off your nose for you…

If only I could see better into that lodge! I’d like to borrow the opera glasses from the fellow next to me, but he’d eat me up if I disturbed him in the least in his concentration… In which section is Kopetzky’s sister? Will I be able to recognize her?… I’ve only seen her two or three times, the last time was in the officer’s mess… Are they all decent girls, all hundred of them? Oh, sure!… “With the participation of the choir”! Choir… that’s funny – I always thought that meant something like Viennese dancing singers, although I already knew that it was something different… Lovely memories! That time at the “Green Gate”… What was her name? And then she sent me a postcard from Belgrade… Such a nice place! Kopetzky’s doing all right, he’s been sitting for some time now in the café smoking his cigar…

Why’s that fellow over there always looking at me? It seems to me that he’s noticed that I’m bored and don’t belong here… I’d like to tell him to have a somewhat less fresh expression on his face, or otherwise I’ll set it right in the lobby afterwards! Look elsewhere, will you, right away! They’re all afraid when I look them in the face… “You have the nicest eyes I’ve ever seen!” Steffi told me recently… O Steffi, Steffi, Steffi! It’s really Steffi’s fault that I’m sitting here and have to go on moaning like this for hours on end. Ah these eternal postponements by Steffi really get on my nerves! How nice it could have been this evening! I’d really like to reread that little message from Steffi. I’ve got it right here. But if I take it out of my wallet the fellow next to me will eat me alive! Of course I know what’s in it… she can’t come because she has to dine with “him” tonight… Oh, how funny it was ten days ago when she was sitting with him in the Garden Café and I was sitting with Kopetzky facing them, and she was continually making signs to me with her eyes, as we’d arranged. He hadn’t noticed anything – unbelievable! Moreover he must be a Jew! He’s certainly a banker, and that black moustache… he must also be a reserve lieutenant! Well, he shouldn’t come to do his military training in my regiment! But I don’t understand why they let so many Jews become officers… I don’t care though about antisemitism… Recently in that gathering where the incident with the doctor happened at the Mannheimer’s… the Mannheimers themselves must also be Jewish, baptised naturally… however you wouldn’t notice it at all – especially the wife, who’s so blond and with such a nice figure… It was most amusing all in all. Great food, wonderful cigars… I say, who’s got money?

Bravo, bravo! Now it’ll soon be over? Yes, everyone over there’s getting up… it looks good – imposing! – organ music too?… I like the organ a lot… Well, that’s very nice – very nice! It’s true, one should go more often to concerts… I’ll tell Kopetzky that it was wonderful… Will I see him in the café today? – Oh, I don’t feel like going to the café; I had such a bad time there yesterday! Lost a hundred and sixty guilders in one sitting – too stupid! And who won everything? Ballert, just the one who didn’t need it… It’s really Ballert’s fault that I had to go to the damned concert… Yes, otherwise I could have played again today and perhaps won something back. But it’s quite a good thing that I’ve sworn on my honour not to touch a card for a month… Mama will make quite a face when she gets my letter!

Well, she should go to Uncle who’s got money like muck; a couple of hundred guilders is nothing for him. If I could only get him to give me a regular allowance… But no, you have to beg for every extra penny. Then you’ll hear again: ‘The harvest was bad last year!’… Will I be going to visit him for a fortnight this summer?’ It’s really deadly boring there… If however that girl… what was her name?… it’s odd, I can never remember names… Oh, yes: Etelka!… She didn’t understand a word of German, but that wasn’t necessary… we didn’t have to talk at all!… Yes, that was really nice, fourteen days of country air and fourteen nights of Etelka or whoever… But I’d also have to spend eight days with Mama and Papa again… She didn’t look well at Christmas… Well, she should have recovered by now. She should be happy that Papa has gone into retirement. And Klara could still find a husband… The uncle could contribute something… Twenty-eight’s not so old.. Steffi’s certainly no younger… But it’s odd: that kind of woman stays young longer. When one thinks about it: Maretti who played recently in “Madame Sans-Gêne” is certainly thirty-seven and she looks it… Well, I wouldn’t say no! It’s a shame she hasn’t asked me…

It’s getting hot! Still not over? Oh, how I’d like to have some fresh air! I’d like to go for a little walk along the Ring… Today I’ve got to go to bed early, to be nice and fresh tomorrow afternoon! Funny how little I’ve been thinking about it, I’m quite indifferent about the whole thing! The first time I was in quite a state of excitement, though. Not that I was afraid; but I’d been nervous the night before… Really, that First Lieutenant Bisanz was a serious opponent. And nevertheless, nothing happened to me… Already a year and a half ago. How time flies! And if Bisanz couldn’t do anything to me, the doctor certainly won’t be able to… Nevertheless, it’s just that kind of unschooled fencer who’s often the most dangerous. Doschintzky told me that a fellow who’d held a sabre in his hands for the first time in his life had been within a hair’s length of running him through; and Doschintzky’s a fencing teacher now in the Reserves. Admittedly – but whether he could do so much back in those days… The most important thing is: to keep calm. I don’t feel angry about it any more at all, and yet it was just so insulting – unbelievable! He surely wouldn’t have dared to talk like that if he hadn’t already had so much champagne… Such effrontery! Certainly a socialist! Lawyers are all socialists these days… a gang… ideally they’d like to abolish the military; but who would want to help them if the Chinese came along, they don’t think of that! The idiots! One has to set an example sometimes. I was quite in my rights. I’m glad that I didn’t let him off after his remark. When I think about it I become quite wild! But I behaved splendidly; the colonel also said that it was absolutely in order. It’ll help me in general. I know some who would have let the fellow off. Müller for sure, he would have been objective or something like that. Being bjective you make a fool of yourself... “Herr Lieutenant!”… Just the way he said “Herr Lieutenant!” was shameful!… “You’ll have to admit”… How did we get into that? How did I let myself get drawn into an argument with that socialist? How did it begin?… It seems to me that that brunette I’d escorted to the buffet was also there… and then that young fellow, who paints hunting scenes – what was his name?… Upon my soul, it’s he who was responsible for the whole affair! He’d been talking about the manoeuvres and it was then that the doctor came over and said something that didn’t suit me, about war games or suchlike – but where I still couldn’t say anything… Yes, and then the talk turned to the Cadet Academy… Yes, that was it… and I had talked about a patriotic ceremony… and then the doctor said – not right away, but it developed out of the ceremony – “Herr Lieutenant, you must admit that not all of your comrades have gone into the military just to defend the fatherland!” What insolence! To have the nerve to say that to an officer’s face in public! If only I could remember just what I replied to him… Oh yes, something about people who talk about things they don’t understand at all… Yes, that was it… and then there was someone who wanted the matter to be settled peacefully, an older man with a heavy cold… But I was too angry! The doctor had said it absolutely as if he’d meant me directly. It was as if he’d added that I’d been expelled from high school and that that was why I’d gone into the Cadet Academy… People just can’t understand us, they’re too stupid… When I remember how the first time I put on my uniform I had such a unique experience… Last year during the manoeuvres – I would have given anything for it to be for it to have been for real all of a sudden… And Mirovic told me it was the same thing for him. And then when His Highness rode along the front line, and the colonel’s speech – you’d have to be a real swine for your heart not to be beating fast… And then that little octopus comes along who’s never done anything in his whole life but sit behind his books, and permits himself to make such an insolent remark!… Oh just you wait, my dear fellow – until no longer able to fight… Certainly, you’ll no longer be able to fight…

Well, what’s going on? Now it must surely soon be over… “You, his angel, praise the Lord”… – That’s for sure the final chorus… It’s very nice, that cannot be denied. Very nice! – Now I’ve quite forgotten about the girl in the lodge who had started out so making eyes at me. Where is she then?… Already gone away… That one over there seems to be very nice too… Too bad that I don’t have any opera glasses with me! Brunnthaler’s very clever, he always leave his opera glasses at the cash desk, nothing can happen to them there… If that little thing over there would just turn around a little! She’s been sitting there so nicely all the time. That must be her mother next to her. Why haven’t I ever thought seriously about marriage? Willy wasn’t older that I am when he took the leap. How nice it must be to always have a cute little wife on hand at home… Too stupid that Steffi isn’t available today! If I just knew where she was, I could go and sit facing her. It would have been nice if she could have gotten away, then I would have her hanging on my neck!… When I think what his affair with the Winterfeld woman is costing Fließ! And in addition she’s cheating on him left and right. It’ll end awfully… Bravo, bravo! Ah, it’s over!… It’s nice to be able to get up, to move about... Oh, come on! How long will it take him to put his opera glasses back in their case?

“Excuse me, excuse me, can I please pass by?”
What a crush! Let’s let people pass by… An elegant woman… Are those real diamonds?… That one over there’s nice… How she’s looking at me!… Oh yes, my little girl, I’d love to!… Oh, what a nose! – A Jewess… Yet another one… It’s amazing, half of them are Jews… you can’t listen to an oratorio in peace any more… Now I just have to follow the crowd… Why’s that idiot behind me pushing like that? I’ll teach him not to… Oh, an old man… Who’s that saluting me over there?… Have the honour, have the honour! I don’t have the slightest idea who it is… The simplest would be to go over to Leidinger’s for supper… or should I go to the Garden Café? Perhaps Steffi’s there too… Why on earth didn’t she write to me to tell me where she was going? She wouldn’t have known herself. It’s really awful, such a dependant existence… the poor thing! So, there’s the exit… Ah, that one there’s really lovely! All alone? How she’s smiling at me! That would be an idea – I’ll go after her!… Well, there are the stairs going down: oh, a major from the Ninety-Fifth… He greeted me in the most friendly way… I’m not the only officer who’s come here… Where’s that pretty girl? Ah, over there… she’s standing at the railing… Well, now it’s a matter of the vestiary… If only that little one doesn’t get away… She’s already got someone! Such a miserable little hussy! She’s had someone meet her at the entrance, and now she’s smiling back at me! None of them are worth anything… My God, there’s a crowd here at the cloakroom!… It would be better to wait a little… Well! If the damned fellow would only take my number!…

“You there, no. 224! It’s hanging right there! Don’t you have any eyes? It’s hanging right there! Oh, thank God!… Well, thanks!”
The fat fellow there’s practically blocking up the whole cloakroom… “Excuse me!”…
“Patience, patience!”
What’s the fellow saying?
“Just a little patience!”
I’ve just got to reply… “Make way!”
“Ho, you won’t miss anything!”
What’s he saying there? Did he say that to me? It’s too much! I can’t let him get away with that!... “Calm down!”
“What are you saying?”
Ah, in such insolent tone! This has to stop!
“Don’t push!”
“You, shut your trap!” I shouldn’t have said that, it was too gross… Well, now it’s been done!
“What are you saying?”
Now he’s turning around… But I know him! Thunder and lightening, it’s the master baker who always comes into the café… What’s he doing here? He must have a daughter or someone in the choir… Well, what’s this? What’s he doing? It seems to me… Yes, my soul, he’s got his hand on my sabre-hilt… Is the fellow crazy?
“You, Sir…”
“You, Lieutenant, be very quiet now.”
What did he say? For God’s sake, did anyone hear that? No, he said it in a very low voice… Well, why doesn’t he let go of my sabre?… Oh my God… he’s really furious… I can’t force his hand off the hilt… there mustn’t be a scandal now!… Isn’t the major at the end of the line behind me?… Has anyone noticed that he’s holding onto the hilt of my sabre? He’s talking to me! What’s he saying then?
“Lieutenant, if you make the slightest fuss, I’ll take the sabre out of its scabbard, I’ll break it in two and I’ll send the pieces to the colonel of your regiment. Do you understand me, you stupid little boy?”
What’s he said? I think I must be dreaming! Is he really talking to me? I should answer something… But the fellow’s serious – he’s really pulling the sabre out. My God – he’s doing it!… I can feel it, he’s pulling it out! What’s he saying then?… For the love of God, there mustn’t be a scandal – What’s he still saying?
“But I don’t want to ruin your career… So, be courageous!… Don’t worry, no one has heard anything… everything’s all right… fine! And so that no one thinks that we’ve had an argument, I’ll now be most friendly with you!… Have the honour, Lieutenant, I’ve been very pleased – have the honour!”
For God’s sake, have I been dreaming? Did he really say that?… Where is he then?… He’s over there… I’ve got to take out my sabre and cut him to pieces – For God’s sake, did anyone overhear?… No, he was speaking in a very low voice, directly into my ear… Why don’t I go over to him and hack his head off?… No, that won’t do, it won’t do… I should’ve done it right away… Why didn’t I do it right away? I couldn’t… he wouldn’t let go of the hilt, and he’s ten times stronger than I am… If I’d said a single word he would really have broken my sabre… I should be happy that he didn’t say anything out loud! If anyone had heard, I would’ve had to shoot myself on the spot… Perhaps it’s all been a dream… Why’s that fellow at the column over there looking at me? Did he perhaps hear something after all?… I’ll ask him… Ask? I’m quite crazy! What would that look like? Is anyone paying attention to me? I must be quite pale. Where’s that hound?… I’ve got to bring him down… He’s gone… It’s already quite empty here now… Where’s my coat?… I’ve already put it on… I hadn’t even noticed… Who helped me with that? Ah, that one over there… I must give him a tip… There!… But what’s going on? Did it really happen? Did someone really talk to me like that? Did someone really call me a “stupid little boy?” And I didn’t cut him down on the spot?… But I just couldn’t… he’s got a fist like steel… I was like nailed to the spot… No, I must have lost all my senses, otherwise I had the other hand… But then he would have taken the sabre out and broken it, and it would have all been over – everything would have been over! And after that, when he’d left, it was too late… I couldn’t have stabbed him in the back with my sabre…

What, am I already out on the street? How did I get here? It’s so cool… ah, the wind does me good… Who’s that over there then? Why are they looking over here at me? Perhaps they heard something… No, no one could have heard anything… I know that for sure, I looked around right away! No one was paying attention to me, no one heard anything… But he did say it, even if no one heard it; he certainly said it. And I just stood there and didn’t do anything, it was as if someone had hit me on the head… But I couldn’t say anything, couldn’t do anything; there was only one thing I could do: to shut up, to shut up!… it’s horrible, it’s unbearable; I’ve got to kill him whenever I come across him!… That someone should say that to me! A fellow like that, such a hound! And he even knows me, my God, he knows me, he knows who I am! He can tell anyone what he’d said to me!… No, no that he won’t do, otherwise he wouldn’t have spoken in such a low voice… he wanted me to be the only one to hear him,… But who can guarantee to me that he won’t tell the story, today or tomorrow, to his wife, to his daughter, to his friends in the café? – For God’s sake, I’ll be seeing him again tomorrow! When I go into the café tomorrow he’ll be sitting over there like he does every day, playing cards with Herr Schlesinger and with the seller of artificial flowers… No, no, that won’t do, it won’t do… When I see him, I’ll cut him to pieces… No, I can’t… I should’ve done it right away, right away!… If only I’d done it! I’ll go to the Colonel and tell him about it… yes, to the Colonel… the Colonel’s always been well disposed towards me – and I’ll say to him: Colonel, I respectfully report that he took hold of my sword hilt, he wouldn’t let go of it, it was as if I were unarmed… What will the Colonel say? What’ll he say? But he can only say one thing: you must resign with a dishonourable discharge – resign!… Are those volunteers over there?… It’s disgusting, in the night they look like officers… They’re saluting! – If they only knew – if they only knew!… There’s the Hochleitner Café… A few of the fellows are no doubt in there… perhaps one or two others that I know… If I told anyone about it as if it had happened to someone else?… I’ve already gone quite out of my mind, for sure… Why am I roaming around here? What am I doing out in the street? – All very well, but where should I go? Didn’t I want to go to Leidinger’s? Oh, sure – to sit down with other people… I think everyone would see it in me... Yes, but something has to be done… What would happen then? Nothing, nothing – no one heard anything… no one knows about it… for the moment no one knows anything… If I went over to his home now and were able to get him to swear that he won’t tell anyone about it?… – Oh, rather put a bullet in my head than that!… That would be the most intelligent way!… The most intelligent way? The most intelligent way? – But there’s nothing else at all… there’s nothing else… If I could ask the Colonel, or Kopetzky – or Blany – or Friedmaier: every one of them would say: there’s nothing else to do!… What if I talked it over with Kopetzky? Yes, that would certainly be the most reasonable thing to do… because of tomorrow already, naturally – because of tomorrow… at four o’clock in the cavalry barracks… I have to fight there at four o’clock in the afternoon tomorrow… and I’ll never be able to be there, I won’t be able to give him satisfaction… It’s crazy, crazy! No one knows anything, no one knows anything! There are a lot of people going around to whom worse things are happening than to me… What didn’t people say about Deckener when he he’d exchanged shots with Rederow and the honour-council had decided that a duel could take place… But what could the honour-council decide in my case? Stupid little boy – stupid little boy… and I just stood there! Holy heaven, it doesn’t matter what others know!… I know, and that’s the main thing! I feel that I’m now a different person from an hour ago – I know that I’m incapable of defending my honour, and that I have to commit suicide… I won’t have a peaceful moment any more for the rest of my life… I’d always be afraid that someone could learn about it, in one way or another… and that someone could say to my face what had happened today! What a happy fellow I’d been up to an hour ago… and Kopetzky had to give me that ticket – and Steffi, that minx, had to cancel our get-together! – One’s fate depends on such things… In the afternoon everything was going well, and now I’m lost and have to kill myself… Why am I running around like this? It serves no purpose… What time is that clock striking?… 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11... eleven o’clock, eleven o’clock… I should go somewhere for supper… finally, I have to go somewhere… I could certainly go to any old dive where no one knows me – you just have to eat, even when you’ve got to kill yourself afterwards… Ha, death isn’t a child’s game… who said that recently?… But it’s all the same to me…

I wonder who’ll be the most affected?… Mama or Steffi?… Steffi… God, Steffi… she won’t be able to let anything show, otherwise “he” would give her the push… Poor thing! – In the regiment – no one will have the slightest idea why I did it… they’d all rack their brains over it… whyever did Gustl shoot himself? None of them will be able to find out that I’d had to shoot myself because a miserable baker, a low-down fellow like that, by chance has a stronger fist… it’s too idiotic, too idiotic!… That someone like me, such a young, fetching fellow… Everyone will certainly say afterwards: he shouldn’t have had to do it on account of such a stupidity; it’s such a shame!… But if I now asked anyone whoever they’d all give me the same answer… and I myself, if I asked myself… that’s what’s so devilish about it… we’re defenseless against civilians… People think we’re better than them because we have a sabre… and if one of us uses it they all think that we’re born murderers… it’ll probably be in the papers… “Suicide of a young officer”… What do they always say?: “The motives are clouded in mystery”… Ha, ha!… “Respects were paid at his coffin"… But it’s quite true… it’s as if I wanted to tell myself a story… but it’s quite true… I have to kill myself, there’s nothing else to do – I certainly can’t let it happen that tomorrow morning Kopetzky and Blany give me my mandate back and tell me: We can’t be your seconds!… I’d be a scoundrel if I blamed them… A fellow like me who just stood there and let himself be called a stupid boy… everyone will know about it tomorrow… it’s too stupid of me to have imagined for an instant that someone like that wouldn’t talk about it… he’ll talk about it everywhere… his wife already knows about it… tomorrow the whole café’ll know about it… the waiters will know about it… Herr Schlesinger – the cashier woman – and even if he’d undertaken not to talk about it, he’d talk about it the next day… and if not then next week… and if he had a stroke tonight, I know about it… I know about it… and I’m not the kind to continue wearing the uniform and carrying a sabre when such a disgrace is hanging on him… So I have to do it, that’s all there is to it! – What else is there? Tomorrow afternoon the doctor could cut me down with his sabre… such things have already happened… and that peasant, the poor fellow who got brain fever and was done for in three days… and Brenitsch who fell off his horse and broke his neck… and finally and once and for all: there’s nothing else to be done – nothing else for me, nothing else for me! – There are people who’d take it more lightly… God, there are all kinds of people!… Ringeimer, who’d had an affair with the wife of a butcher, and after getting a tap on the ear from the fellow had left the service and is installed somewhere in the countryside where he got married… That there are women who’d marry a man like that!… – My soul, I wouldn’t shake his hand if he came back to Vienna… So, did you hear that, Gustl: finished, your life’s finished! That’s all there is to it!… So, now that I know that, the affair’s very simple… There! I’m really quite calm… Moreover I’ve always known that when the time comes, I’ll be calm, very calm… but I never thought it’d happen like that… that I’d have to commit suicide because of such a… Perhaps I didn’t really understand him properly… perhaps he said something quite different after all… I was really in quite a state because of the singing and the heat… perhaps I’d become a bit crazed, and none of it’s really true?… Not true, ha ha, not true! – I can still hear it… it’s still ringing in my ears… and I can feel it in my fingers, how I tried to take his hand off the hilt of my sword… he’s a powerful man, a colossus… Although I’m not a weakling: Franziski’s the only one in the regiment who’s stronger than I am...

The Aspern Bridge… How far am I going to go? – if I continue like this I’ll be in Kagran by midnight… Ha, ha! My God, we were happy when we arrived there last September. "Two hours more, and then Vienna"… I was dead tired when we came back… I slept like a stone the whole afternoon and in the evening we got together at Ronacher’s… Kopetzky, Ladinser and… who else was with us? Oh yes, the volunteer who told us that Jewish story… Sometimes they’re very good fellows, those volunteers for one year… but they should stay non-commissioned officers – what’s the sense to it? We have to slave away for years, and a fellow serves one year and has exactly the same rank as us… it’s not right! But what does all that matter to me? What do I care about such things? A conscripted commoner’s certainly more that I am now: I’m nothing at all anymore in this world… it’s all over with me… Honour lost, all is lost!… I’ve nothing else to do than to load my revolver and… Gustl, Gustl, it seems to me that you’re still not thinking straight about it! Just come to your senses… there’s nothing else… you can torture your brain all you like, there’s nothing else! – Now it’s only a question of behaving decently in the final moments, to be a man, to be an officer, so that the Colonel will say: he was a good fellow, we’ll have a proper funeral ceremony for him!… How many companies are convoked to a lieutenant’s funeral?… I should know that precisely… Ha, ha! Even if the whole battalion came, or the whole garrison, and they fired twenty salves, that would never wake me up! That’s the café where I was sitting last summer with the fellow from Engel after the Army Steeplechase… Odd that I haven’t seen him since… Why was his left eye bandaged up? I wanted to ask him about it but it wouldn’t have been proper… There are two artillery fellows over there… They certainly think that I’m chasing that woman… Moreover I should have a look at her… Oh, horrible! – I’d like to know how someone like that earns her bread… I should do that before… Moreover, in times of need the devil even eats flies… I remember in Przemysl – I was so disgusted afterwards that I swore never to touch a loose woman again… That was a horrible time over there in Galicia… it was really a lucky break that we came back to Vienna. Bokorny is still stationed in Sambor and might stay there ten more years and turn grey there… But if I’d stayed there, what happened to me today wouldn’t have happened… and I’d rather become old and grey in Galicia than that… than what? Yes, what is it? What is it? Have I lost my senses, that I’m always forgetting about it? My soul, I’m indeed forgetting… Has it ever been heard of that someone has to put a bullet in his head in a couple of hours’ time and that he thinks of all kinds of things that are no longer possible for him? My soul, it’s just as if I were completely drunk! Ha, ha! A real drunkenness! A deadly drunkenness! A suicidal drunkenness! – Ha! I’m making puns, what a joke! – Well, I’m in a good mood – that must be innate in me… It’s true that if I told someone about it, he wouldn’t believe me. I think that if I had that thing on me… I’d press on the trigger right away – in a second it’d all be over… Not everyone has it so easy – others have to suffer for months on end… my poor cousin was lying there for two years, she couldn’t move, she was suffering atrociously – such a pity! Isn’t it better when you can take care of it yourself? You’ve just got to take care to aim properly, so that it doesn’t finish badly, like for that replacement cadet last year… The poor devil didn’t die but went blind… What happened to him after that? Where’s he living now? It’s terrible to have to go around like that – or rather, he can’t go around, he has to be led about – such a young boy, he can’t even be twenty now… he got his fiancée better… she died on the spot… It’s unbelievable, the reasons some people shoot themselves! How can anyone be jealous at all?… I’ve never felt like that in my whole life… Steffi’s presumably now comfortably installed in the Garden Café; then she’ll go home with “him”… I don’t care, I don’t care at all… She’s got a nice installation – that little bathroom with the red lamp. She looked so nice in that green silk dressing-gown… I’ll never see that green silk dressing-gown again – nor Steffi… and I’ll also never go up that nice wide stairway in the Gusshaus Street again… Miss Steffi will continue to enjoy herself as if nothing had happened… she’ll never tell be able to tell anyone that her beloved Gustl had killed himself… But she’ll cry about it – oh, yes, she’ll cry! In any case, some people will cry over it… Oh my God, my mother! – No, no, I mustn’t think about that – no, that doesn’t bear thinking about… Don’t think about your home, Gustl, understand? – Not the slightest thought…

Well, well, now I’m in the Prater park… in the middle of the night… I never would’ve thought this morning that I’d be going for a walk in the Prater tonight… What’s that night watchman over there thinking about?… Well, let’s go on a bit further on… it’s really nice here… it doesn’t matter about the supper, or about the café; the air’s nice and it’s calm here… very… Certainly, I’ll very soon be calm, as calm as I could wish to be. Ha, ha! But I’m quite out of breath… I’ve been racing along senselessly… slower, go slower Gustl, you’re not missing anything, you don’t have anything to do – nothing at all, absolutely nothing any more! I seem to be shivering – it must be the excitement… and then I haven’t eaten anything… What’s smelling so strongly there?… Nothing can be blooming already… What are we then today? The fourth of April… Really, it’s rained a lot recently… but the trees are still practically bare and it’s dark enough – you really could be afraid! Really the only time in my life that I was afraid was when I was a little boy, in the forest… but I wasn’t all as little as all that… fourteen or fifteen… How long ago was that now? – Nine years ago… really – at eighteen I was a replacement, at twenty lieutenant… and next year I’ll be… What’ll I be next year? What does that mean at all: next year? What does it mean: next week? What does it mean: tomorrow?…What? my teeth are chattering? Ha! – let them chatter a little… My dear Lieutenant, you’re now alone, you don’t need to pretend anything to anyone… it’s bitter, it’s bitter…

I’ll sit down on this bench… Well, how far have I gone now? – it’ so dark! Over there behind me, that must be the second café… I went there once last summer, at our orchestra’s concert… with Kopetzky and Rüttner – a few others were there too… I’m rather tired… no, I’m as tired as if I’d been marching for ten hours… Well, that would really be something, to fall asleep here. Ha! A lieutenant sleeping out in the open… Well, I really should go back home… what would I do at home? And what am I doing in the Prater? What I’d prefer would be to never have to get up at all – to fall asleep here and never wake up… Yes, that would be really nice! No, you won’t get off so easily, Lieutenant!… But how and when? Now I can properly review the whole question… everything has to be considered… it’s like that once in a lifetime… So let’s consider… What now?… – Oh, the air’s nice… one should go to the Prater more often in the night… Well, that should have occurred to me earlier, now it’s over with the Prater, with enjoying the air here and with going for a promenade… Well, so what then? Ah, off with my cap; it seems to be pressing into my brain… I can’t think straight at all… Ah… so… Put your thoughts in order, Gustl!… make your final dispositions… So tomorrow morning it’ll all be over… tomorrow at seven… seven o’clock’s a good time. Ha, ha! So at eight, when the lessons begin, it’ll all be over… But Kopetzky won’t be able to go to classes, because he’ll be too upset… But perhaps he won’t have heard about it yet… no one might hear anything… They only found Max Lippay in the afternoon, and he’d shot himself in the morning but no one had heard anything… But what do I care if Kopetzky has classes or not?… Ha! So at seven o’clock! Yes… well, what then? There’s nothing more to consider. I’ll shoot myself in my room and then it’ll all be over! On Monday there’ll be the funeral… I know someone who’ll be happy about it: the doctor!… The duel can’t take place because of the suicide of one of the duellists… What’ll the Mannheimers say about it? Well, he won’t care much… but his wife, the pretty blonde… with her there were possibilities… Oh, yes, it seems to me that I would have had my chances if I’d just gone about it properly… Yes, she’d have been something different from Steffi, that minx… But you couldn’t go about it crudely… it would have meant to go courting, to send flowers, to talk cleverly… you couldn’t just say: come on over to the barracks tomorrow! Oh, yes, such a decent woman, that would have been something… The wife of my captain in Przemysl certainly wasn’t a decent woman… I could have sworn that Libitzky and Wermutek and that shabby deputy officer also had her… But Mrs Mannheimer… Yes, that would have been something else, that would also certainly have been a complete change, one that could almost turn you into another kind of man – you could acquire a different sort of polish – you could respect yourself – But there are always those low people around… and I began so young – I was still really a boy when I had my first holiday and went to my parents’ home in Graz… Reidl was there too – it had been a Bohemian woman… she must have been twice as old as I was – I only came back home in the morning… How my father looked at me… and Klara… I was above all ashamed in front of Klara… She was engaged at the time… why didn’t anything come of it? I’ve never been much bothered about that… poor child, she’s never had much luck – and now she’s going to lose her only brother… Yes, you’ll never see Klara again – enough! Well little sister, did you ever think that when you accompanied me to the train station on New Year’s Day you’d never see me again? And Mama… My God, Mama… no, I mustn’t think of that… if I think of that, I’d be capable of doing something dishonourable… Oh… if only I could first go back home… if I could say that I was on leave for one day… just to see Papa, Mama, Klara once more before I put an end to everything… Yes, with the first train at seven I could leave for Graz, I’d be there at one o’clock… Greetings, Mama… Hello, Klara! Well, how are you then?… Well, this is a surprise!… But they might notice something… If no one else did, Klara would… Klara certainly… She’s such a clever girl… How lovingly she wrote to me recently, and I still owe her a reply – and the good advice she always gives me… such a wonderful person… wouldn’t everything be different if I just stayed at home? I could study economics and work in my uncle’s company… they all wanted me to when I was a boy… I would’ve already been married now, with a nice girl… perhaps Anna, who liked me so much… I noticed that also the last time I went home, even though she was already married with two children… I saw how she was looking at me… and she still called me “Gustl” like before… She’ll be all shaken up when she learns what happened to me – but her husband will say: “I’m not surprised – such an awful fellow!” Everyone will think it was because I had debts… and it’s not true, everything’s paid up… there’s just the last hundred and sixty guilders – well, they’ll be there tomorrow… Yes, for that I’ve got to make sure that Ballert gets his hundred and sixty guilders back… I must note that down, before I shoot myself… it’s horrible, horrible!… If I could just go away instead – to America, where no one knows me… no one in America knows what happened here yesterday evening… no one cares about it there… Recently there was an account in the newspaper of a Count Runge, who’d had to go away there on account of a dirty affair, and now he’s got a hotel and couldn’t care less about the whole mess… And after a few years you could come back… not to Vienna, naturally… nor to Graz… but I could go to the family property… and Mama and Papa and Klara would certainly prefer a thousand times over that I just remained alive… And what do I care about the others? Who otherwise cares about me? Apart from Kopetzky no one would miss me… Kopetzky’s the only one… And he was precisely the one who gave me the concert ticket today… and it’s all because of that ticket… without it I wouldn’t have gone to the concert and none of all that would have happened… So what happened? It seems as if a hundred years had passed since then, and it can’t even have been more than two hours ago… Two hours ago someone called me a stupid little boy and was going to break my sword in two… My God, I’m still shouting out loud in the middle of the night! Why did all that happen? Couldn’t I have waited a little longer, until the vestiary was quite empty? And why did I have to say to him then: “Shut your trap!”? What got into me? I’m usually a polite person… I’ve never been so rude to my orderly… but naturally I was in a state – everything that had come together then… the bad luck at cards and the eternal postponements by Steffi – and the duel tomorrow afternoon – and I’ve slept badly these past few days – and the racket in the barracks – one can’t stand it after a while!… So, the long and the short of it is that I wasn’t well – I should have gone on leave… Now that’s no longer necessary – now I’ll have a longer holiday – without pay – ha, ha!…

How long am I going to stay sitting here? It must be past midnight… didn’t I hear it striking midnight earlier? What’s that there… a coach going by? At this time? A rubber-wheeled coach – I can just imagine… They’re better off than I am – perhaps it’s Ballert with his Bertha… Why should it be Ballert? – Just go on! – His Highness in Przemysl had a nice coach… he was constantly going into town in it to see the Rosenberg woman… His Highness was a nice fellow – a real comrade, talking familiarly to one and all… Those were certainly good times… although… the region was dismal and killingly hot in summer… one afternoon three fellows collapsed with sunstroke…and the corporal of my unit too… such a serviceable fellow… We all stayed lying naked on our beds all afternoon. At one point Wiesner suddenly came over to me; I must have been dreaming and I jumped up and pulled out my sabre that was lying next to me… it must have looked spectacular… Wiesner almost killed himself laughing – he’s already a cavalry captain now… It’s a shame I didn’t go into the cavalry… but the old man didn’t want me to – it would have been a too expensive pleasantry – now it’s all one and the same… Why then? Well, I… I know well enough: I have to die, that’s why it’s all one and the same – I have to die… But how? Look here Gustl, you’ve come a long way down into the Prater here on purpose, in the middle of the night, where not a soul is stirring – you can now calmly consider everything… All that about America and leaving the service was sheer nonsense, and you’re much too dumb to start doing anything else – and if you were a hundred years old and you thought about it, that someone had been going to break your sword in two and had called you a stupid little boy and that you’d just stood there and didn’t do anything – no, there’s nothing to think about – what’s happened has happened – all that about Mama and Klara was nonsense too – they’ll soon get over it – one gets over anything… How Mama cried when her brother died – and four weeks later she hardly thought about it any longer… she went to the cemetery at first once a week, then once a month – and now only on the day of his death. Tomorrow’s the day of my death – the fifth of April. Will they take me to Graz? Ha! The worms in the grass will have a feast! But that’s not my concern – the others will be puzzled by it… So, what exactly do I have to do?… Yes, the hundred and sixty guilders for Ballert – that’s all – I don’t have to make any other dispositions. Letters to write? What for? To whom?… To say good-bye? To the devil with that, it’s clear enough when one shoots oneself! Then everyone willl know you’ve taken your leave… If people knew how indifferent I am about the whole thing, they wouldn’t have to regret me at all… It’s really not a pity… And what have I gotten out of my whole life? – I would have liked to have had something more: a war – but I could have waited a long time for that… And I’ve had everything else… Whether a girl’s called Steffi or Kunigunde, it’s all the same. And I’ve seen the finest operettas too – I’ve already been to see “Lohengrin” twelve times – and this evening I was at an oratorio – and a baker has called me a stupid little boy – My God, that’s quite enough! – And I’ve really never been curious about things… So let’s slowly go home, quite slowly… I’ve no need to hurry. I’ll stay in the Prater here for a few more minutes, on a bench – without a roof over my head. I’ll never lie down on my bed again – I’ve enough time to sleep my fill. Ah, the air here! – I’ll miss it…

What’s going on? – Hey, Johann, bring me a glass of fresh water… What’s going on? Where am I, am I dreaming?… My head!… Oh, thunder… dammit… I can’t get my eyes open! I’m all dressed! – Where am I sitting then? Holy heaven, I’ve been sleeping! How could I have fallen asleep? It’s already dawning! – How long did I sleep for? – I’ve got to look at my watch… I can’t see anything! Where are my matches? … Well, will one of them light up? Three o’clock… and I have a duel at four in the afternoon – no, not a duel – I’ve got to shoot myself! It’s not about the duel; I have to shoot myself because a baker called me a stupid little boy… Did that really happen? My head feels so bizarre… it’s as if my neck were in a vice – I can hardly move – my right leg’s fallen asleep. Get up, get up! Ah, that’s better! It’s already getting lighter… And the air’s like it was when I was on early-morning watch and had camped in the woods… That was another kind of waking up – then I had another day ahead of me… It seems that I still don’t really believe in it. There’s the street, all grey, empty – I must now be the only person in the whole Prater. I came down here once at four in the morning with Pausinger – we’d ridden down – I was on Captain Mirovic’s horse and Pausinger had his own nag… it was in May last year – everything was already blooming then – everything was green. Now it’s still all bare – but spring’s coming soon – it’ll be here in a few days. Lilies of the valley, violets – it’s a shame that I’ll never be able to benefit from them anymore – any good-for-nothing will be able to and I have to die! It’s a pity! And the others will be sitting in the wine-garden after supper as if nothing had happened – like when we were all sitting in that wine-garden after supper in the evening after the day that they’d carried Lippay away… And Lippay was so well-loved… everyone in the regiment preferred him to me – why shouldn’t they be sitting in the wine-garden after I’ve kicked the bucket? It’s quite warm – much warmer than yesterday – and such scents – it’ll soon be blooming here… Will Steffi bring flowers? But she won’t think of that at all! She’ll go out on the town right away… Yes, if it’d still been Adel… Ah, Adel! It seems to me that I haven’t thought about her for two years now… What a fuss she made when it was all over… I’ve never seen a girl cry so much in all my life… She was really the loveliest one I ever had… she was so modest, so unpretentious – I could swear that she really loved me. She was something else than Steffi… I’d just like to know why I gave her up… I was such a donkey! She’d become too dull for me, yes, that was it… To go out every evening with the same person… Then I was afraid that I’d never be able to get away at all – what a scene there was! No, Gustl, you should have waited a while longer – she was the only one who really loved you… I wonder what she’s doing now? Well, what does it matter? – Now she’ll surely have someone else… Really it’s easier with Steffi – when you’re just occasionally involved and another fellow has all the unpleasantness, and you just have the pleasure… Yes, for that you can’t expect her to come to the cemetery… Who’d go with her anyway, if he didn’t have to? Perhaps Kopetzky, and that’s it! – It’s sad not to have anyone at all…

But that’s all nonsense! About Papa and Mama and Klara… Of course I’m the son, the brother… but what more is there between us? They’re certainly fond of me – but what do they know about me? – That I’m doing my service, that I play cards and that I go around with low women… but otherwise? – That sometimes I’ve been disgusted by myself, that I still haven’t written to them – well, it seems to me hat I’ve never really even known it myself. What are you doing thinking about such things now, Gustl? All that’s missing is that you start crying… To the devil with that! – Walk properly… like that! Whether you’re going to a rendezvous or to stand guard or into battle… who said that?… Ah, yes, Major Lederer in the mess when we were talking about Wingleder who’d been so pale before his first duel – and he’d thrown up … Yes: whether you’re going to a rendezvous or to a sure death, the real officer lets nothing show in his stride and in his face! So Gustl – Major Lederer has said it! Ha!

It’s still getting lighter… you could already read… What’s whistling over there? Ah, the North Station’s over there… The Tegetthoff Column… it’s never seemed so tall before… There are coaches over there… But there’s no one but street-sweepers about… my last street-sweepers – ha! I have to laugh when I think about it… I don’t understand it at all… Is it like that with everyone when you know for sure? It shows half-past three on the North Station clock… Now there’s just the matter of whether I shoot myself at seven o’clock local time or at seven o’clock Vienna time?… Seven o’clock… Well, why precisely seven o’clock?… As if I couldn’t do it some other time… I’m hungry – my soul, I’m hungry – no wonder… since when haven’t I eaten?… since – since yesterday at six in the evening at the café… Yes, when Kopetzky gave me the ticket – a coffee cream and two croissants. What’ll the baker say when he learns about it? The damned hound! – Oh, he’ll know why – it’ll be obvious to him – he’ll see what it means to be an officer! – That kind of fellow can let himself be beaten up in the street without any consequences, and if one of us is insulted in public he’s finished… If at least you could hit someone like that – but no, then he’d have been more careful, then he wouldn’t have risked it… And the fellow continues to live, he continues to live calmly, while I – I have to blow my brains out! – He’s killed me… Yes, Gustl, do you see that? He’s the one who’s killing you! But he shouldn’t get off so easily! – No, no, no! I’ll write a letter to Kopetzky, where I’ll tell everything, I’ll write the whole story down… or even better: I’ll write it to the Colonel, I’ll make a report to the regimental command… quite like an official report… Yes, just you wait, you think you can keep something like that secret? You’re mistaken – it’ll be written for eternity, and then I’d like to see if you can still go into the café! Ha! “I’d like to see” is good!… I’d really like to see it, but it unfortunately that won’t be possible – it’ll all be over!

Now Johann’ll be coming into my room, now he’ll see that the Lieutenant hasn’t slept in his bed. He’ll think of all kinds of things that might have happened, but that the Lieutenant had spent the night in the Prater, my soul, he won’t think of that... Ah, the Forty-fourth regiment! They’re going to target practice – let’s let them pass by… so we’ll stay here for a moment… Over there a window’s opening up – she’s a lovely one – hello, I should at least wrap something around me when I go to the window… Last Sunday was the last time… I never would have dreamed that the last time would be with Steffi. Oh, my God, that’s the only real pleasure… Well, well, the Colonel will ride nobly along here in two hours’ time… the commanders have an easy lot – yes indeed, they look good – that’s very nice… If they knew how little I care about them! – Well, isn’t that something: Katzer!… since when did he transfer to the Forty-forth? Greetings, greetings! What kind of face is he making? Why’s he pointing to his head? My dear, your skull doesn’t interest me very much… Ah, so! No, my dear, you’re mistaken, I didn’t sleep overnight in the Prater… you’ll read about it in the evening paper. “It’s not possible!” he’ll say, “this morning as we were going to shooting practice I met him on the Prater Street!” Who’ll get my unit? Will they give it to Walterer? Well, that’d be something – a gutless fellow, he should have become a shoemaker… What, the sun’s already coming up? It’ll be a nice day – a really nice spring day… It’s really a hellish situation! That coach-driver will still be going out and about at eight in the morning and I… well, so what? Hey, that would be something – right at the last moment to lose control of myself because of a coach-driver… How is it that all of a sudden my heart’s beating like this? – It can’t be because of that… no, oh no… it’s because I haven’t eaten for so long. But Gustl, be honest with yourself: you’re afraid – afraid, because you’ve never yet been faced with it… But that doesn’t help, fear has never helped anyone, everyone has to go through with it, some earlier, some later, and it’s happening to you early… You’ve never been worth much, so behave yourself decently at least one good last time, that I ask of you! Well, I still have to think about it… but what’s there to consider? it’s really quite simple: it’s lying in the drawer of the night desk, it’s loaded too, and all you have to do is to press the trigger – that won’t need any special skill!

That one’s already going to her shop… those poor girls! Adel also worked in a shop – I went to meet her there a few times in the evening… When they work in a shop, they don’t become that kind of woman… If Steffi wanted to belong to me alone, I’d let her become a milliner or suchlike… How’ll she learn about it? – from the newspaper … She’ll be upset that I didn’t write to her… It seems to me that I’m overdoing it… What do I care if she’s upset?… How long has the whole thing been going on for?… Since January?… Oh no, it must have already been before Christmas… I’d brought her sweets from Graz, and at the New Year she sent me a little letter… A nice letter, that I have in my apartment… aren’t there any there that I should burn up?… Hm, the one from Fallsteiner – if anyone comes across that letter it could be unpleasant for the fellow… What’s that to me? – No, it’s no big difficulty… but I don’t want to have to search around for a scrap of paper… The best thing would be to burn them all up… who needs them? They’re just a lot of wastepaper – And I can leave my few books to Blany. "Through Night and Ice"… it’s a shame that I never finished it… I haven’t read much recently…

Organ music – ah, coming from the church… early mass – I haven’t been to one for a long time… the last time was in February when my unit had been instructed to go there… But that doesn’t count… I’d paid attention to my men, that they were devout and behaved correctly… I might go into the church… finally there’s something to it… Well, today after breakfast I’ll know for sure… Ah, “after breakfast” is very good!… So, what about it, shall I go in? – I think it’d be a consolation for Mama if she knew! … Klara doesn’t care so much about it… Well, let’s go in – it can’t do any harm! Organ – singing – hm! – What is it then? I feel all dizzy… Oh God, Oh God! I must have someone I could talk to about it beforehand! That would be something – to go to confession! The priest would make such a face if I ended up by saying: good day, your worthiness, I’m going to kill myself now… I’d like to lie down on the floor and start crying… No, one mustn’t do that… But sometimes crying does a lot of good for you… Let’s sit down here for a moment – but don’t fall asleep again like in the Prater!… People who have religion are better off… Ah, now my hand’s starting to tremble!… If this continues I’ll end up being so disgusting that I’ll kill myself out of shame! That old woman there – what she’s praying for? It would be something if I said to her: “Please include me in your prayer too… I’ve never learned how to do it properly"… Ha! It seems that death is making me idiotic! Get up! What does that melody remind me of? Holy heaven! Yesterday evening! Get out, get out, I can’t stand it!… Pst! Don’t make such a racket, don’t let your sword clatter like that – don’t disturb people in their devotions – there! – it’s much better out here in the open…

Light… Ah, it’s coming ever closer – if only it could be over and done with! I should have already done it – in the Prater… you shouldn’t go out without your revolver… If I’d had it yesterday evening… My God once again! I could have some breakfast in the café… I’m hungry… Before, I always thought it strange that people who’re condemned to death still drink coffee and smoke a little cigar in the morning beforehand… Good grief, I haven’t had a smoke! I don’t even want to have a smoke… It’s odd that I want to go to the café… It’s already open, and none of us are there yet now – nevertheless… it’d be a sign of cold-bloodedness. “He had breakfast at six o’clock in the café, and at seven he shot himself.” I’m quite calm again… walking about’s so pleasant – and the best of it is that no one’s forcing me to do it. If I wanted to I could throw over the whole mess… America… What’s that: “the whole mess”? What “mess”? It’s as if I’d had a sunstroke… Ho, I’m perhaps so calm because I still imagine that I don’t have to do it? … I have to! I have to! No, I want to! Can you just imagine, Gustl, that you just take your uniform off and go away? And the damned hound would kill himself laughing – and Kopetzky himself wouldn’t shake hands with you ever again… I think I’ve become quite red with embarrassment, just thinking about it. That night watchman’s saluting me… I must acknowledge him… “Greetings!” Now I’ve actually said “Greetings!”… That always satisfies the poor fellows… Well, no one’s had anything to complain about me – outside of my service hours I’ve always behaved correctly. Like when we were on manoeuvres and I handed out cigars to the company’s non-commissioned officers. Once I heard a fellow behind me during arms exercises muttering something about a “damned hassle” and I didn’t report him – I just said to him: “Be careful, someone else might hear you – it’ll go badly for you!”… The castle courtyard… Who’s on watch there today? The Bosnians – they look fine – the first lieutenant recently said: when we were down there in ‘78, no one would have believed that they’d ever be so obedient! … My God, I could have been in something like that! They’re all getting up from the bench. Greetings, greetings! It’s just too bad that it never came to that. It would have been better, on the field of honour, for the fatherland, than like this… Yes, my dear doctor, you’re being let off… Perhaps one of ours could replace me? My soul, I should leave a message that Kopetzky or Wymetal should fight with the fellow in my place… Ah he shouldn’t get away with it so easily! Oh well, isn’t it all the same to me, what happens afterwards? I’ll never learn what happened! The flowers are blooming there… Once I talked to a girl in the Volksgarten park – she had a red dress on – she lived in the Strozzi Street – Rochlitz took her on afterwards… I think he’s still with her, although he doesn’t talk about it – he’s ashamed of it perhaps… Steffi’s still sleeping now… she looks so lovely when she’s sleeping… as if she didn’t know how to count up to five! Ah, they all look like that when they’re sleeping! I should write her a letter… why not? That’s what one should do, write some letters beforehand. I should also write to Klara that she should console Mama and Papa – and what one writes on such occasions – and also to Kopetzky… my soul, it seems to me that it’d be easier just to say good-bye to a few people… And the report to the regimental commander – and the hundred and sixty guilders for Ballert… there’s really still a lot to be done… Well, no one has forced me to do it at seven… up to eight there’s time enough to be dead! To be dead, yes – that’s what it’s called – you can’t do anything about it…

The Ring Road – I’ll soon be in my café… it seems that I’m really looking forward to breakfast… it’s hard to believe! Well, after breakfast I’ll light up a cigar and then I’ll go home and write… Yes, above all the report to the regimental command; then the letter to Klara – then to Kopetzky – then to Steffi… What should I write to that little minx?… “My dear child, you’ve never thought”… Oh, what nonsense! “My dear child, I’m very grateful”… “My dear child, before I go away, I don’t want to omit”… No, writing letters has never been my strong point… “My dear child, a last farewell from your Gustl” – The face that she’ll make! It’s a good thing that I don’t love her… it must be sad, when one loves someone and then… Well, Gustl, be firm: it’s sad enough as it is… After Steffi there would’ve been others, and finally too one who would’ve been worth it – a young girl from a good family with a dowry – that would have been so nice… I have to write to Klara thoroughly explaining why I couldn’t do anything else… “You must forgive me, dear sister, and please, console our beloved parents. I know that I’ve given you all a lot of trouble and given you pain; but believe me: I’ve always loved you all, and I hope that you’ll some day be happy again, my dear Klara, and won’t completely forget your unhappy brother… " Oh, I’d prefer not to write to her at all!… No, it’ll just bring me to tears… my eyes are already smarting just thinking about it… Above all I have to write to Kopetzky – a comradely farewell, and that he should pass it on to the others… Is it already six o’clock? Ah, no: half past, a quarter to. That’s a cute little face!… The little minx with the black eyes, that I’ve seen so often in Floriani Street – what’ll she say? But she doesn’t know who I am at all – she’ll only wonder why she doesn’t see me any more… The day before yesterday I said to myself that the next time I see her I’ll talk to her… she’s been coquettish long enough… as young as that – finally she might still be quite innocent… Oh, Gustl! Never put off to tomorrow what you can do today! That fellow over there’s surely been up all night. Well, now he’ll soon go calmly home and lie down – me too! Ha, ha! Now it’s becoming serious, Gustl, really … Well, if it weren’t a bit gruesome, there wouldn’t be anything to it – and on the whole, I have to say so myself, I’m being courageous about it… Ah, where are we then? There’s my café… they’re still sweeping out… Well, let’s go in…

Over there’s the table where they always play cards… It’s funny, I can hardly imagine that the fellow who’s always sitting over there at the wall was the one who… no one’s yet there… Where’s the waiter? Hello! He’s coming out of the kitchen… he’s quickly slipping into his frack-coat… It’s really not necessary… Oh, for him it is… he still has to serve other people today!
“Have the honour, Lieutenant!”
“Good morning!”
“So early today, Lieutenant?”
“Ah, never mind – I don’t have much time, I’ll sit over there with my coat on.”
“What would you like to order, Lieutenant?”
“A coffee with cream.”
“Right away, Lieutenant!”
Ah, there are newspapers there… today’s papers already? If something about it’s already in there?… What are you saying? It’s as if I want to see if they’ve announced that I’ve committed suicide! Ha, ha! Why am I still standing up? … Let’s sit over there by the window… He’s already put my café cream there… I’ll pull the curtain down, I don’t want people looking in here at me. Although no one’s passing by. Ah, the coffee tastes good – breakfast’s certainly not a vain illusion! It makes you another man – the stupid thing about it all is that I didn’t have any supper last night… Why’s the fellow coming back over here? Oh yes, he’s bringing the croissants…
“Did you hear the news, Lieutenant?”
“What news?” For God’s sake, does he already know about it? But that’s nonsense, it’s not possible!
“About Herr Habetswallner…”
What? That’s the name of the baker… what’s he going to say now?… Has he already been here then, and told everyone about it?… Why doesn’t he say anything more?… But he is saying something…
“… he had a stroke last night at midnight.”
“What?”… I mustn’t shout like that… no, I mustn’t let anyone notice anything… but perhaps I’m dreaming… I’ve got to ask him some more questions… “Who’s had a stroke?” That was very good, quite perfect! – I said it quite naturally!
“The master baker, Lieutenant!… You certainly know him… yes, the heavy-set fellow who has a game of cards every afternoon near the officers’ table… with Herr Schlesinger and Herr Wasner from the flower-shop across the road!”
I’m quite awake – everything’s in order – and yet I still can’t really believe it – I’ve got to ask him more about it… but quite unaffectedly…
“He had a stroke?… Oh, how’s that, then – how do you know about it?”
“But, Lieutenant, who should know about it sooner that us – the croissants that the lieutenant’s eating there come from Herr Habetswallner’s establishment. The boy who brings them to us at half past four in the morning told us about it.”
For the love of heaven I mustn’t betray myself… I’d like to shout… I’d like to burst out laughing… I’d like to give Rudolf a big kiss… But I’ve still got to ask him something!… To have had a stroke doesn’t mean to be dead… I’ve got to ask if he’s dead… but very calmly, for what do I care about a baker – I have to look at the newspaper while I’m talking to the waiter…”
“Is he dead?”
“Yes, certainly, Lieutenant, he was dead on the spot.” Oh, splendid, splendid! – Finally, that’s why I went into the church!…
“He’d gone to the theatre yesterday evening; it happened to him as he was going up his stairs – the house-master heard the crash… yes, and then they carried him into his apartment, and when the doctor arrived it had all been over for quite some time.”
“That’s very sad. He was in the his best years.” I said that most excellently – no one could have noticed anything… and I really have to control myself, that I don’t cry out or jump onto the billiard table…
“Yes, Lieutenant, very sad, he was such a nice person, and he’s been coming here for twenty years – he was a good friend of our manager. And his poor wife…”
I think I’ve never been so happy in my whole life… He’s dead – he’s dead! No one knows anything and nothing has happened! – And the stroke of luck is that I came into the café this morning… otherwise I would’ve shot myself for nothing – it’s like an act of destiny – Where’s Rudolf gone to? Ah, he’s talking to the cook’s assistant… So, he’s dead – he’s dead – I just can’t believe it! I’d love to go over there to see for myself. Finally he had a stroke because of his temper, because of the anger he’d been holding back… Oh, for whatever reason, it’s all the same to me! The main thing is that he’s dead and that I’m alive, and everything’s back in order again!… Funny that I’m still dipping into my coffee the croissant that Herr Habetswallner had baked for me! They’re very tasty, my noble Herr Habetswallner! Terrific! – Well, now I can smoke another cigar!…
“Rudolf, I say, Rudolf! Do leave the cook’s assistant in peace!”
“Certainly, Lieutenant!”
“A cigar!”… I’m so happy, just so gay!… What’ll I do now? What’ll I do?… I’ve got to do something, otherwise I’ll have a stroke myself from pure joy!… In a quarter of an hour I’ll go to the barracks and let Johann rub me down… at half past seven there’s the presentation of arms and at half past nine the exercises. And I’ll write to Steffi that she’s just got to be free this evening, at all costs! And at four this afternoon… just you wait, my dear fellow, just wait! I’m really in the mood… I’ll hack you to pieces!



Arthur Schnitzler
(1862-1931)


LEUTNANT GUSTL

Wie lang’ wird denn das noch dauern? Ich muß auf die Uhr schauen... schickt sich wahrscheinlich nicht in einem so ernsten Konzert. Aber wer sieht’s denn? Wenn’s einer sieht, so paßt er gerade so wenig auf, wie ich, und vor dem brauch’ ich mich nicht zu genieren... Erst viertel auf zehn?... Mir kommt vor, ich sitz’ schon drei Stunden in dem Konzert. Ich bin’s halt nicht gewohnt... Was ist es denn eigentlich? Ich muß das Programm anschauen... Ja, richtig: Oratorium! Ich hab’ gemeint: Messe. Solche Sachen gehören doch nur in die Kirche! Die Kirche hat auch das Gute, daß man jeden Augenblick fortgehen kann. – Wenn ich wenigstens einen Ecksitz hätt’! – Also Geduld, Geduld! Auch Oratorien nehmen ein End’! Vielleicht ist es sehr schön, und ich bin nur nicht in der Laune. Woher sollt’ mir auch die Laune kommen? Wenn ich denke, daß ich hergekommen bin, um mich zu zerstreuen... Hätt’ ich die Karte lieber dem Benedek geschenkt, dem machen solche Sachen Spaß; er spielt ja selber Violine. Aber da wär’ der Kopetzky beleidigt gewesen. Es war ja sehr lieb von ihm, wenigstens gut gemeint. Ein braver Kerl, der Kopetzky! Der einzige, auf den man sich verlassen kann... Seine Schwester singt ja mit unter denen da oben. Mindestens hundert Jungfrauen, alle schwarz gekleidet; wie soll ich sie da herausfinden? Weil sie mitsingt, hat er auch das Billett gehabt, der Kopetzky... Warum ist er denn nicht selber gegangen? – Sie singen übrigens sehr schön. Es ist sehr erhebend – sicher! Bravo! Bravo!... Ja, applaudieren wir mit. Der neben mir klatscht wie verrückt. Ob’s ihm wirklich so gut gefällt? – Das Mädel drüben in der Loge ist sehr hübsch. Sieht sie mich an oder den Herrn dort mit dem blonden Vollbart?... Ah, ein Solo! Wer ist das? Alt: Fräulein Walker, Sopran: Fräulein Michalek... das ist wahrscheinlich Sopran... Lang’ war ich schon nicht in der Oper. In der Oper unterhalt’ ich mich immer, auch wenn’s langweilig ist. Übermorgen könnt’ ich eigentlich wieder hineingeh’n, zur ›Traviata‹. Ja, übermorgen bin ich vielleicht schon eine tote Leiche! Ah, Unsinn, das glaub’ ich selber nicht! Warten S’ nur, Herr Doktor, Ihnen wird’s vergeh’n, solche Bemerkungen zu machen! Das Nasenspitzel hau’ ich Ihnen herunter...
Wenn ich die in der Loge nur genau sehen könnt’! Ich möcht’ mir den Operngucker von dem Herrn neben mir ausleih’n, aber der frißt mich ja auf, wenig ich ihn in seiner Andacht stör’... In welcher Gegend die Schwester vom Kopetzky steht? Ob ich sie erkennen möcht’? Ich hab’ sie ja nur zwei- oder dreimal gesehen, das letztemal im Offizierskasino... Ob das lauter anständige Mädeln sind, alle hundert? O jeh!... »Unter Mitwirkung des Singvereins«! – Singverein... komisch! Ich hab’ mir darunter eigentlich immer so was Ähnliches vorgestellt, wie die Wiener Tanzsängerinnen, das heißt, ich hab’ schon gewußt, daß es was anderes ist!.. Schöne Erinnerungen! Damals beim ›Grünen Tor‹... Wie hat sie nur geheißen? Und dann hat sie mir einmal eine Ansichtskarte aus Belgrad geschickt... Auch eine schöne Gegend! – Der Kopetzky hat’s gut, der sitzt jetzt längst im Wirtshaus und raucht seine Virginia!...
Was guckt mich denn der Kerl dort immer an? Mir scheint, der merkt, daß ich mich langweil’ und nicht herg’hör’... Ich möcht’ Ihnen raten, ein etwas weniger freches Gesicht zu machen, sonst stell’ ich Sie mir nachher im Foyer! – Schaut schon weg!... Daß sie alle vor meinem Blick so eine Angst hab’n... »Du hast die schönsten Augen, die mir je vorgekommen sind!« hat neulich die Steffi gesagt... O Steffi, Steffi, Steffi! – Die Steffi ist eigentlich schuld, daß ich dasitz’ und mir stundenlang vorlamentieren lassen muß. – Ah, diese ewige Abschreiberei von der Steffi geht mir wirklich schon auf die Nerven! Wie schön hätt’ der heutige Abend sein können. Ich hätt’ große Lust, das Brieferl von der Steffi zu lesen. Da hab’ ich’s ja. Aber wenn ich die Brieftasche herausnehm’, frißt mich der Kerl daneben auf! – Ich weiß ja, was drinsteht... sie kann nicht kommen, weil sie mit »ihm« nachtmahlen gehen muß... Ah, das war komisch vor acht Tagen, wie sie mit ihm in der Gartenbaugesellschaft gewesen ist, und ich vis-à-vis mit’m Kopetzky; und sie hat mir immer die Zeichen gemacht mit den Augerln, die verabredeten. Er hat nichts gemerkt – unglaublich! Muß übrigens ein Jud’ sein! Freilich, in einer Bank ist er, und der schwarze Schnurrbart... Reserveleutnant soll er auch sein! Na, in mein Regiment sollt’ er nicht zur Waffenübung kommen! Überhaupt, daß sie noch immer so viel Juden zu Offizieren machen – da pfeif ich auf’n ganzen Antisemitismus! Neulich in der Gesellschaft, wo die G’schicht’ mit dem Doktor passiert ist bei den Mannheimers... die Mannheimer selber sollen ja auch Juden sein, getauft natürlich... denen merkt man’s aber gar nicht an – besonders die Frau so blond, bildhübsch die Figur... War sehr amüsant im ganzen. Famoses Essen, großartige Zigarren... Naja, wer hat’s Geld?...
Bravo, bravo! Jetzt wird’s doch bald aus sein? – Ja, jetzt steht die ganze G’sellschaft da droben auf... sieht sehr gut aus – imposant! – Orgel auch?... Orgel hab’ ich sehr gern... So, das laß’ ich mir g’fall’n – sehr schön! Es ist wirklich wahr, man sollt’ öfter in Konzerte gehen... Wunderschön ist’s g’wesen, werd’ ich dem Kopetzky sagen... Werd’ ich ihn heut’ im Kaffeehaus treffen? – Ah, ich hab’ gar keine Lust, ins Kaffeehaus zu geh’n; hab’ mich gestern so gegiftet! Hundertsechzig Gulden auf einem Sitz verspielt – zu dumm! Und wer hat alles gewonnen? Der Ballert, grad’ der, der’s nicht notwendig hat... Der Ballert ist eigentlich schuld, daß ich in das blöde Konzert hab’ geh’n müssen... Na ja, sonst hätt’ ich heut’ wieder spielen können, vielleicht doch was zurückgewonnen. Aber es ist ganz gut, daß ich mir selber das Ehrenwort gegeben hab’, einen Monat lang keine Karte anzurühren... Die Mama wird wieder ein G’sicht machen, wenn sie meinen Brief bekommt! –
Ah, sie soll zum Onkel geh’n, der hat Geld wie Mist; auf die paar hundert Gulden kommt’s ihm nicht an. Wenn ich’s nur durchsetzen könnt’, daß er mir eine regelmäßige Sustentation gibt... aber nein, um jeden Kreuzer muß man extra betteln. Dann heißt’s wieder: Im vorigen Jahr war die Ernte schlecht!... Ob ich heuer im Sommer wieder zum Onkel fahren soll auf vierzehn Tag’? Eigentlich langweilt man sich dort zum Sterben... Wenn ich die... wie hat sie nur geheißen?... Es ist merkwürdig, ich kann mir keinen Namen merken!... Ah, ja: Etelka!... Kein Wort deutsch hat sie verstanden, aber das war auch nicht notwendig... hab’ gar nichts zu reden brauchen!... Ja, es wird ganz gut sein, vierzehn Tage Landluft und vierzehn Nächt’ Etelka oder sonstwer... Aber acht Tag’ sollt’ ich doch auch wieder beim Papa und bei der Mama sein... Schlecht hat sie ausg’seh’n heuer zu Weihnachten... Na, jetzt wird die Kränkung schon überwunden sein. Ich an ihrer Stelle wär’ froh, daß der Papa in Pension gegangen ist. – Und die Klara wird schon noch einen Mann kriegen... Der Onkel kann schon was hergeben... Achtundzwanzig Jahr’, das ist doch nicht so alt... Die Steffi ist sicher nicht jünger... Aber es ist merkwürdig: die Frauenzimmer erhalten sich länger jung. Wenn man so bedenkt: die Maretti neulich in der ›Madame Sans-Gêne‹ – siebenunddreißig Jahr’ ist sie sicher, und sieht aus... Na, ich hätt’ nicht Nein g’sagt! – Schad’, daß sie mich nicht g’fragt hat...
Heiß wird’s! Noch immer nicht aus? Ah, ich freu’ mich so auf die frische Luft! Werd’ ein bißl spazieren geh’n, übern Ring... Heut’ heißt’s: früh ins Bett, morgen nachmittag frisch sein! Komisch, wie wenig ich daran denk’, so egal ist mir das! Das erstemal hat’s mich doch ein bißl aufgeregt. Nicht, daß ich Angst g’habt hätt’; aber nervos bin ich gewesen in der Nacht vorher... Freilich, der Oberleutnant Bisanz war ein ernster Gegner. – Und doch, nichts ist mir g’scheh’n!... Auch schon anderthalb Jahr’ her. Wie die Zeit vergeht! Und wenn mir der Bisanz nichts getan hat, der Doktor wird mir schon gewiß nichts tun! Obzwar, gerade diese umgeschulten Fechter sind manchmal die gefährlichsten. Der Doschintzky hat mir erzählt, daß ihn ein Kerl, der das erstemal einen Säbel in der Hand gehabt hat, auf ein Haar abgestochen hätt’; und der Doschintzky ist heut’ Fechtlehrer bei der Landwehr. Freilich – ob er damals schon so viel können hat... Das Wichtigste ist: kaltes Blut. Nicht einmal einen rechten Zorn hab’ ich mehr in mir, und es war doch eine Frechheit – unglaublich! Sicher hätt’ er sich’s nicht getraut, wenn er nicht Champagner getrunken hätt’ vorher... So eine Frechheit! Gewiß ein Sozialist! Die Rechtsverdreher sind doch heutzutag’ alle Sozialisten! Eine Bande... am liebsten möchten sie gleich ’s ganze Militär abschaffen; aber wer ihnen dann Helfen möcht’, wenn die Chinesen über sie kommen, daran denken sie nicht. Blödisten! – Man muß gelegentlich ein Exempel statuieren. Ganz recht hab’ ich g’habt. Ich bin froh, daß ich ihn nimmer auslassen hab’ nach der Bemerkung. Wenn ich dran denk’, werd’ ich ganz wild! Aber ich hab’ mich famos benommen; der Oberst sagt auch, es war absolut korrekt. Wird mir überhaupt nützen, die Sache. Ich kenn’ manche, die den Burschen hätten durchschlüpfen lassen. Der Müller sicher, der wär’ wieder objektiv gewesen oder so was. Mit dem Objektivsein hat sich noch jeder blamiert... »Herr Leutnant!«... schon die Art, wie er »Herr Leutnant« gesagt hat, war unverschämt!... »Sie werden mir doch zugeben müssen«... – Wie sind wir denn nur d’rauf gekommen? Wieso hab’ ich mich mit dem Sozialisten in ein Gespräch eingelassen? Wie hat’s denn nur angefangen?... Mir scheint, die schwarze Frau, die ich zum Büfett geführt hab’, ist auch dabei gewesen... und dann dieser junge Mensch, der die Jagdbilder malt – wie heißt er denn nur?... Meiner Seel’, der ist an der ganzen Geschichte schuld gewesen! Der hat von den Manövern geredet; und dann erst ist dieser Doktor dazugekommen und hat irgendwas g’sagt, was mir nicht gepaßt hat, von Kriegsspielerei oder so was – aber wo ich noch nichts hab’ reden können... Ja, und dann ist von den Kadettenschulen gesprochen worden... Ja, so war’s... und ich hab’ von einem patriotischen Fest erzählt... und dann hat der Doktor gesagt – nicht gleich, aber aus dem Fest hat es sich entwickelt – »Herr Leutnant, Sie werden mir doch zugeben, daß nicht alle Ihre Kameraden zum Militär gegangen sind, ausschließlich um das Vaterland zu verteidigen!« So eine Frechheit! Das wagt so ein Mensch einem Offizier ins Gesicht zu sagen! Wenn ich mich nur erinnern könnt’, was ich d’rauf geantwortet hab’?... Ah ja, etwas von Leuten, die sich in Dinge dreinmengen, von denen sie nichts versteh’n... Ja, richtig... und dann war einer da, der hat die Sache gütlich beilegen wollen, ein älterer Herr mit einem Stockschnupfen... Aber ich war zu wütend! Der Doktor hat das absolut in dem Ton gesagt, als wenn er direkt mich gemeint hätt’. Er hätt’ nur noch sagen müssen, daß sie mich aus dem Gymnasium hinausg’schmissen haben und daß ich deswegen in die Kadettenschul’ gesteckt worden bin... Die Leut’ können eben unserein’n nicht versteh’n, sie sind zu dumm dazu... Wenn ich mich so erinner’, wie ich das erstemal den Rock angehabt hab’, so was erlebt eben nicht ein jeder... Im vorigen Jahr’ bei den Manövern – ich hätt’ was drum gegeben, wenn’s plötzlich Ernst gewesen wär’... Und der Mirovic hat mir g’sagt, es ist ihm ebenso gegangen. Und dann, wie Seine Hoheit die Front abgeritten sind, und die Ansprache vom Obersten – da muß einer schon ein ordentlicher Lump sein, wenn ihm das Herz nicht höher schlägt... Und da kommt so ein Tintenfisch daher, der sein Lebtag nichts getan hat, als hinter den Büchern gesessen, und erlaubt sich eine freche Bemerkung!... Ah, wart’ nur, mein Lieber – bis zur Kampfunfähigkeit... Jawohl, du sollst so kampfunfähig werden...
Ja, was ist denn? Jetzt muß es doch bald aus sein?... »Ihr, seine Engel, lobet den Herrn«... – Freilich, das ist der Schlußchor... Wunderschön, da kann man gar nichts sagen. Wunderschön! – Jetzt hab’ ich ganz die aus der Loge vergessen, die früher zu kokettieren angefangen hat. Wo ist sie denn?... Schon fortgegangen... Die dort scheint auch sehr nett zu sein... Zu dumm, daß ich keinen Operngucker bei mir hab’! Der Brunnthaler ist ganz gescheit, der hat sein Glas immer im Kaffeehaus bei der Kassa liegen, da kann einem nichts g’scheh’n... Wenn sich die Kleine da vor mir nur einmal umdreh’n möcht’! So brav sitzt s’ alleweil da. Das neben ihr ist sicher die Mama. – Ob ich nicht doch einmal ernstlich ans Heiraten denken soll? Der Willy war nicht älter als ich, wie er hineingesprungen ist. Hat schon was für sich, so immer gleich ein hübsches Weiberl zu Haus vorrätig zu haben... Zu dumm, daß die Steffi grad’ heut’ keine Zeit hat! Wenn ich wenigstens wüßte, wo sie ist, möcht’ ich mich wieder vis-à-vis von ihr hinsetzen. Das wär’ eine schöne G’schicht’, wenn ihr der draufkommen möcht’, da hätt’ ich sie am Hals... Wenn ich so denk’, was dem Fließ sein Verhältnis mit der Winterfeld kostet! Und dabei betrügt sie ihn hinten und vorn. Das nimmt noch einmal ein Ende mit Schrecken... Bravo, bravo! Ah, aus!... So, das tut wohl, aufsteh’n können, sich rühren... Na, vielleicht! Wie lang’ wird der da noch brauchen, um sein Glas ins Futteral zu stecken?
»Pardon, pardon, wollen mich nicht hinauslassen?«...
Ist das ein Gedränge! Lassen wir die Leut’ lieber vorbeipassieren... Elegante Person... ob das echte Brillanten sind?... Die da ist nett... Wie sie mich anschaut!... O ja, mein Fräulein, ich möcht’ schon!... O, die Nase! – Jüdin... Noch eine... Es ist doch fabelhaft, da sind auch die Hälfte Juden... nicht einmal ein Oratorium kann man mehr in Ruhe genießen... So, jetzt schließen wir uns an... Warum drängt denn der Idiot hinter mir? Das werd’ ich ihm abgewöhnen... Ah, ein älterer Herr!... Wer grüßt mich denn dort von drüben?... Habe die Ehre, habe die Ehre! Keine Ahnung hab’ ich, wer das ist... Das Einfachste wär’, ich ging gleich zum Leidinger hinüber nachtmahlen... oder soll ich in die Gartenbaugesellschaft? Am End’ ist die Steffi auch dort? Warum hat sie mir eigentlich nicht geschrieben, wohin sie mit ihm geht? Sie wird’s selber noch nicht gewußt haben. Eigentlich schrecklich, so eine abhängige Existenz... Armes Ding! – So, da ist der Ausgang... Ah, die ist aber bildschön! Ganz allein? Wie sie mich anlacht. Das wär’ eine Idee, der geh’ ich nach!... So, jetzt die Treppen hinunter: Oh, ein Major von Fünfundneunzig... Sehr liebenswürdig hat er gedankt... Bin doch nicht der einzige Offizier herin gewesen... Wo ist denn das hübsche Mädel? Ah, dort... am Geländer steht sie... So, jetzt heißt’s noch zur Garderobe.. Daß mir die Kleine nicht auskommt... Hat ihm schon! So ein elender Fratz! Laßt sich da von einem Herrn abholen, und jetzt lacht sie noch auf mich herüber! – Es ist doch keine was wert... Herrgott, ist das ein Gedränge bei der Garderobe!... Warten wir lieber noch ein bisserl... So! Ob der Blödist meine Nummer nehmen möcht’?...
»Sie, zweihundertvierundzwanzig! Da hängt er! Na, hab’n Sie keine Augen? Da hängt er! Na, Gott sei Dank!... Also bitte!«...
Der Dicke da verstellt einem schier die ganze Garderobe... »Bitte sehr!«...
»Geduld, Geduld!«
Was sagt der Kerl?
»Nur ein bisserl Geduld!«
Dem muß ich doch antworten... »Machen Sie doch Platz!«
»Na, Sie werden’s auch nicht versäumen!«
Was sagt er da? Sagt er das zu mir? Das ist doch stark! Das kann ich mir nicht gefallen lassen! »Ruhig!«
»Was meinen Sie?«
Ah, so ein Ton! Da hört sich doch alles auf!
»Stoßen Sie nicht!«
»Sie, halten Sie das Maul!« Das hätt’ ich nicht sagen sollen, ich war zu grob... Na, jetzt ist’s schon g’scheh’n!
»Wie meinen?«
Jetzt dreht er sich um... Den kenn’ ich ja! – Donnerwetter, das ist ja der Bäckermeister, der immer ins Kaffeehaus kommt... Was macht denn der da? Hat sicher auch eine Tochter oder so was bei der Singakademie... Ja, was ist denn das? Ja, was macht er denn? Mir scheint gar... Ja, meiner Seel’, er hat den Griff von meinem Säbel in der Hand... Ja, ist der Kerl verrückt?... »Sie, Herr...«
»Sie, Herr Leutnant, sein S’ jetzt ganz stad.«
Was sagt er da? Um Gottes willen, es hat’s doch keiner gehört? Nein, er red’t ganz leise... Ja, warum laßt er denn meinen Säbel net aus?... Herrgott noch einmal... Ah, da heißt’s rabiat sein... ich bring’ seine Hand vom Griff nicht weg... nur keinen Skandal jetzt!... Ist nicht am End’ der Major hinter mir?... Bemerkt’s nur niemand, daß er den Griff von meinem Säbel hält? Er red’t ja zu mir! Was red’t er denn?
»Herr Leutnant, wenn Sie das geringste Aufsehen machen, so zieh’ ich den Säbel aus der Scheide, zerbrech’ ihn und schick’ die Stück’ an Ihr Regimentskommando. Versteh’n Sie mich, Sie dummer Bub?«
Was hat er g’sagt? Mir scheint, ich träum’! Red’t er wirklich zu mir? Ich sollt’ was antworten... Aber der Kerl macht ja Ernst – der zieht wirklich den Säbel heraus. Herrgott – er tut’s!... Ich spür’s, er reißt schon d’ran! Was red’t er denn?... Um Gottes willen, nur kein’ Skandal – – Was red’t er denn noch immer?
»Aber ich will Ihnen die Karriere nicht verderben... Also, schön brav sein!... So, hab’n S’ keine Angst, ’s hat niemand was gehört... es ist schon alles gut... so! Und damit keiner glaubt, daß wir uns gestritten haben, werd’ ich jetzt sehr freundlich mit Ihnen sein! – Habe die Ehre, Herr Leutnant, hat mich sehr gefreut – habe die Ehre!«
Um Gottes willen, hab’ ich geträumt? Hat er das wirklich gesagt?... Wo ist er denn?... Da geht er... Ich müßt’ ja den Säbel ziehen und ihn zusammenhauen – – Um Gottes willen, es hat’s doch niemand gehört?... Nein, er hat ja nur ganz leise geredet, mir ins Ohr... Warum geh’ ich denn nicht hin und hau’ ihm den Schädel auseinander?... Nein, es geht ja nicht, es geht ja nicht... gleich hätt’ ich’s tun müssen... Warum hab’ ich’s denn nicht gleich getan?... Ich hab’s ja nicht können... er hat ja den Griff nicht auslassen, und er ist zehnmal stärker als ich... Wenn ich noch ein Wort gesagt hätt’, hätt’ er mir wirklich den Säbel zerbrochen... Ich muß ja noch froh sein, daß er nicht laut geredet hat! Wenn’s ein Mensch gehört hätt’, so müßt’ ich mich ja stante pede erschießen... Vielleicht ist es doch ein Traum gewesen... Warum schaut mich denn der Herr dort an der Säule so an? – Hat der am End’ was gehört?... Ich werd’ ihn fragen... Fragen? – Ich bin ja verrückt! – Wie schau’ ich denn aus? – Merkt man mir was an? – Ich muß ganz blaß sein. – Wo ist der Hund?... Ich muß ihn umbringen!... Fort ist er... Überhaupt schon ganz leer... Wo ist denn mein Mantel?... Ich hab’ ihn ja schon angezogen... Ich hab’s gar nicht gemerkt... Wer hat mir denn geholfen? Ah, der da... dem muß ich ein Sechserl geben... So!... Aber was ist denn das? Ist es denn wirklich gescheh’n? Hat wirklich einer so zu mir geredet? Hat mir wirklich einer »dummer Bub« gesagt? Und ich hab’ ihn nicht auf der Stelle zusammengehauen?... Aber ich hab’ ja nicht können... er hat ja eine Faust gehabt wie Eisen... ich bin ja dagestanden wie angenagelt... Nein, ich muß den Verstand verloren gehabt haben, sonst hätt’ ich mit der anderen Hand... Aber da hätt’ er ja meinen Säbel herausgezogen und zerbrochen, und aus wär’s gewesen – Alles wär’ aus gewesen! Und nachher, wie er fortgegangen ist, war’s zu spät... ich hab’ ihm doch nicht den Säbel von hinten in den Leib rennen können...
Was, ich bin schon auf der Straße? Wie bin ich denn da herausgekommen? – So kühl ist es... ah, der Wind, der ist gut... Wer ist denn das da drüben? Warum schau’n denn die zu mir herüber? Am End’ haben die was gehört... Nein, es kann niemand was gehört haben... ich weiß ja, ich hab’ mich gleich nachher umgeschaut! Keiner hat sich um mich gekümmert, niemand hat was gehört... Aber gesagt hat er’s, wenn’s auch niemand gehört hat; gesagt hat er’s doch. Und ich bin dagestanden und hab’ mir’s gefallen lassen, wie wenn mich einer vor den Kopf geschlagen hätt’!... Aber ich hab’ ja nichts sagen können, nichts tun können; es war ja noch das einzige, was mir übrig geblieben ist: stad sein, stad sein!... ’s ist fürchterlich, es ist nicht zum Aushalten; ich muß ihn totschlagen, wo ich ihn treff!... Mir sagt das einer! Mir sagt das so ein Kerl, so ein Hund! Und er kennt mich Herrgott noch einmal, er kennt mich, er weiß, wer ich bin! Er kann jedem Menschen erzählen, daß er mir das g’sagt hat!... Nein, nein, das wird er ja nicht tun, sonst hätt’ er auch nicht so leise geredet... er hat auch nur wollen, daß ich es allein hör’,.... Aber wer garantiert mir, daß er’s nicht doch erzählt, heut’ oder morgen, seiner Frau, seiner Tochter, seinen Bekannten im Kaffeehaus. – – Um Gottes willen, morgen seh’ ich ihn ja wieder! Wenn ich morgen ins Kaffeehaus komm’, sitzt er wieder dort wie alle Tag’ und spielt seinen Tapper mit dem Herrn Schlesinger und mit dem Kunstblumenhändler... Nein, nein, das geht ja nicht, das geht ja nicht... Wenn ich ihn seh’, so hau’ ich ihn zusammen... Nein, das darf ich ja nicht... gleich hätt’ ich’s tun müssen, gleich!... Wenn’s nur gegangen wär’! Ich werd’ zum Obersten geh’n und ihm die Sache melden... ja, zum Obersten... Der Oberst ist immer sehr freundlich – und ich werd’ ihm sagen: Herr Oberst, ich melde gehorsamst, er hat den Griff gehalten, er hat ihn nicht auslassen es war genau so, als wenn ich ohne Waffe gewesen wäre... – Was wird der Oberst sagen? – Was er sagen wird? – Aber da gibt’s ja nur eins: quittieren mit Schimpf und Schand’ – quittieren!... Sind das Freiwillige da drüben?... Ekelhaft, bei der Nacht schau’n sie aus, wie Offiziere... sie salutieren! – Wenn die wüßten – wenn die wüßten!... – – Da ist das Café Hochleitner... Sind jetzt gewiß ein paar Kameraden drin... vielleicht auch einer oder der andere, den ich kenn’... Wenn ich’s dem ersten Besten erzählen möcht’, aber so, als wär’s einem andern passiert?... – Ich bin ja schon ganz irrsinnig... Wo lauf’ ich denn da herum? Was tu’ ich denn auf der Straße? – Ja, aber wo soll ich denn hin? Hab’ ich nicht zum Leidinger wollen? Haha, unter Menschen mich niedersetzen... ich glaub’, ein jeder müßt’ mir’s anseh’n... Ja, aber irgendwas muß doch gescheh’n... Was soll denn gescheh’n?... Nichts, nichts – es hat ja niemand was gehört... es weiß ja niemand was... in dem Moment weiß niemand was... Wenn ich jetzt zu ihm in die Wohnung ginge und ihn beschwören möchte, daß er’s niemandem erzählt?... – Ah, lieber gleich eine Kugel vor den Kopf, als so was!... Wär’ so das Gescheiteste!... Das Gescheiteste? Das Gescheiteste? – Gibt ja überhaupt nichts anderes... gibt nichts anderes... Wenn ich den Oberst fragen möcht’, oder den Kopetzky – oder den Blany – oder den Friedmaier: – jeder möcht’ sagen: Es bleibt dir nichts anderes übrig!... Wie wär’s, wenn ich mit dem Kopetzky spräch’? Ja, es wär’ doch das Vernünftigste... schon wegen morgen ja, natürlich – wegen morgen... um vier in der Reiterkasern’... ich soll mich ja morgen um vier Uhr schlagen... und ich darfs ja nimmer, ich bin satisfaktionsunfähig... Unsinn! Unsinn! Kein Mensch weiß was, kein Mensch weiß was! – Es laufen viele herum, denen ärgere Sachen passiert sind, als mir... Was hat man nicht alles von dem Deckener erzählt, wie er sich mit dem Rederow geschossen hat und der Ehrenrat hat entschieden, das Duell darf stattfinden Aber wie möcht’ der Ehrenrat bei mir entscheiden? – Dummer Bub – dummer Bub... und ich bin dagestanden –! Heiliger Himmel, es ist doch ganz egal, ob ein anderer was weiß!... ich weiß es doch, und das ist die Hauptsache! Ich spür’, daß ich jetzt wer anderer bin, als vor einer Stunde – Ich weiß, daß ich satisfaktionsunfähig hin, und darum muß ich mich totschießen... Keine ruhige Minute hätt’ ich mehr im Leben... immer hätt’ ich die Angst, daß es doch einer erfahren könnt’, so oder so... und daß mir’s einer einmal ins Gesicht sagt, was heut’ abend gescheh’n ist! – Was für ein glücklicher Mensch bin ich vor einer Stund’ gewesen... Muß mir der Kopetzky die Karte schenken – und die Steffi muß mir absagen, das Mensch! – Von so was hängt man ab... Nachmittag war noch alles gut und schön, und jetzt bin ich ein verlorener Mensch und muß mich totschießen... Warum renn’ ich denn so? Es lauft mir ja nichts davon... Wieviel schlagt’s denn?... 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11... elf, elf... ich sollt’ doch nachtmahlen geh’n! Irgendwo muß ich doch schließlich hingeh’n... ich könnt’ mich ja in irgendein Beisl setzen, wo mich kein Mensch kennt – schließlich, essen muß der Mensch, auch wenn er sich nachher gleich totschießt... Haha, der Tod ist ja kein Kinderspiel... wer hat das nur neulich gesagt?... Aber das ist ja ganz egal
Ich möcht’ wissen, wer sich am meisten kränken möcht’?... Die Mama, oder die Steffi?... Die Steffi... Gott, die Steffi... die dürft’ sich ja nicht einmal was anmerken lassen, sonst gibt »er« ihr den Abschied... Arme Person! – Beim Regiment – kein Mensch hätt’ eine Ahnung, warum ich’s getan hab’... sie täten sich alle den Kopf zerbrechen... warum hat sich denn der Gustl umgebracht? – Darauf möcht’ keiner kommen, daß ich mich hab’ totschießen müssen, weil ein elender Bäckermeister, so ein niederträchtiger, der zufällig stärkere Fäust’ hat... es ist ja zu dumm, zu dumm! – Deswegen soll ein Kerl wie ich, so ein junger, fescher Mensch... Ja, nachher möchten’s gewiß alle sagen: das hätt’ er doch nicht tun müssen, wegen so einer Dummheit; ist doch schad’!... Aber wenn ich jetzt wen immer fragen tät’, jeder möcht’ mir die gleiche Antwort geben... und ich selber, wenn ich mich frag’... das ist doch zum Teufelholen... ganz wehrlos sind wir gegen die Zivilisten... Da meinen die Leut’, wir sind besser dran, weil wir einen Säbel haben... und wenn schon einmal einer von der Waffe Gebrauch macht, geht’s über uns her, als wenn wir alle die geborenen Mörder wären... In der Zeitung möcht’s auch steh’n... »Selbstmord eines jungen Offiziers«... Wie schreiben sie nur immer?... »Die Motive sind in Dunkel gehüllt«... Haha!... »An seinem Sarge trauern...« – Aber es ist ja wahr... mir ist immer, als wenn ich mir eine Geschichte erzählen möcht’... aber es ist wahr... ich muß mich umbringen, es bleibt mir ja nichts anderes übrig – ich kann’s ja nicht d’rauf ankommen lassen, daß morgen früh der Kopetzky und der Blany mir ihr Mandat zurückgeben und mir sagen: wir können dir nicht sekundieren!... Ich wär’ ja ein Schuft, wenn ich’s ihnen zumuten möcht’... So ein Kerl wie ich, der dasteht und sich einen dummen Buben heißen läßt... morgen wissen’s ja alle Leut’... das ist zu dumm, daß ich mir einen Moment einbilde, so ein Mensch erzählt’s nicht weiter... überall wird er’s erzählen... seine Frau weiß’s jetzt schon... morgen weiß es das ganze Kaffeehaus... die Kellner werd’n’s wissen... der Herr Schlesinger – die Kassierin – – Und selbst, wenn er sich vorgenommen hat, er red’t nicht davon, so sagt er’s übermorgen... und wenn er’s übermorgen nicht sagt, in einer Woche... Und wenn ihn heut’ nacht der Schlag trifft, so weiß ich’s... ich weiß es... und ich bin nicht der Mensch, der weiter den Rock trägt und den Säbel, wenn ein solcher Schimpf auf ihm sitzt!... So, ich muß es tun, und Schluß! – Was ist weiter dabei? – Morgen nachmittag könnt’ mich der Doktor mit ’m Säbel erschlagen... so was ist schon einmal dagewesen... und der Bauer, der arme Kerl, der hat eine Gehirnentzündung ’kriegt und war in drei Tagen hin... und der Brenitsch ist vom Pferd gestürzt und hat sich ’s Genick gebrochen... und schließlich und endlich: es gibt nichts anderes – für mich nicht, für mich nicht! – Es gibt ja Leut’, die’s leichter nähmen... Gott, was gibt’s für Menschen!... Dem Ringeimer hat ein Fleischselcher, wie er ihn mit seiner Frau erwischt hat, eine Ohrfeige gegeben, und er hat quittiert und sitzt irgendwo auf’m Land und hat geheiratet... Daß es Weiber gibt, die so einen Menschen heiraten!... – Meiner Seel’, ich gäb’ ihm nicht die Hand, wenn er wieder nach Wien käm’... Also, hast’s gehört, Gustl: – aus, aus, abgeschlossen mit dem Leben! Punktum und Streusand d’rauf!... So, jetzt weiß ich’s, die Geschichte ist ganz einfach... So! Ich bin eigentlich ganz ruhig... Das hab’ ich übrigens immer gewußt: wenn’s einmal dazu kommt, werd’ ich ruhig sein, ganz ruhig... aber daß es so dazu kommt, das hab’ ich doch nicht gedacht... daß ich mich umbringen muß, weil so ein... Vielleicht hab’ ich ihn doch nicht recht verstanden... am End’ hat er ganz was anderes gesagt... Ich war ja ganz blöd von der Singerei und der Hitz’... vielleicht bin ich verrückt gewesen, und es ist alles gar nicht wahr?... Nicht wahr, haha, nicht wahr! – Ich hör’s ja noch... es klingt mir noch immer im Ohr... und ich spür’s in den Fingern, wie ich seine Hand vom Säbelgriff hab’ wegbringen wollen... Ein Kraftmensch ist er, ein Jagendorfer... Ich bin doch auch kein Schwächling... der Franziski ist der einzige im Regiment, der stärker ist als ich...
Die Aspernbrücke... Wie weit renn’ ich denn noch? – Wenn ich so weiterrenn’, bin ich um Mitternacht in Kagran... Haha! – Herrgott, froh sind wir gewesen, wie wir im vorigen September dort eingerückt sind. Noch zwei Stunden, und Wien... todmüd’ war ich, wie wir angekommen sind... den ganzen Nachmittag hab’ ich geschlafen wie ein Stock, und am Abend waren wir schon beim Ronacher... der Kopetzky, der Ladinser und... wer war denn nur noch mit uns? – Ja, richtig, der Freiwillige, der uns auf dem Marsch die jüdischen Anekdoten erzählt hat... Manchmal sind’s ganz nette Burschen, die Einjährigen... aber sie sollten alle nur Stellvertreter werden – denn was hat das für einen Sinn? Wir müssen uns jahrelang plagen, und so ein Kerl dient ein Jahr und hat genau dieselbe Distinktion wie wir... es ist eine Ungerechtigkeit! – Aber was geht mich denn das alles an? – Was scher’ ich mich denn um solche Sachen? – Ein Gemeiner von der Verpflegsbranche ist ja jetzt mehr als ich: ich bin ja überhaupt nicht mehr auf der Welt... es ist ja aus mit mir... Ehre verloren, alles verloren!... Ich hab’ ja nichts anderes zu tun, als meinen Revolver zu laden und... Gustl, Gustl, mir scheint, du glaubst noch immer nicht recht d’ran? Komm’ nur zur Besinnung... es gibt nichts anderes... wenn du auch dein Gehirn zermarterst, es gibt nichts anderes! – Jetzt heißt’s nur mehr, im letzten Moment sich anständig benehmen, ein Mann sein, ein Offizier sein, so daß der Oberst sagt: Er ist ein braver Kerl gewesen, wir werden ihm ein treues Angedenken bewahren!... Wieviel Kompagnien rücken denn aus beim Leichenbegängnis von einem Leutnant?... Das müßt’ ich eigentlich wissen... Haha! Wenn das ganze Bataillon ausrückt, oder die ganze Garnison, und sie feuern zwanzig Salven ab, davon wach’ ich doch nimmer auf! – Vor dem Kaffeehaus, da bin ich im vorigen Sommer einmal mit dem Herrn von Engel gesessen, nach der Armee-Steeple-Chase... Komisch, den Menschen hab’ ich seitdem nie wieder geseh’n... Warum hat er denn das linke Aug’ verbunden gehabt? Ich hab’ ihn immer d’rum fragen wollen, aber es hätt’ sich nicht gehört... Da geh’n zwei Artilleristen... die denken gewiß, ich steig’ der Person nach... Muß sie mir übrigens anseh’n... O schrecklich! – Ich möcht’ nur wissen, wie sich so eine ihr Brot verdient... da möcht’ ich doch eher... Obzwar, in der Not frißt der Teufel Fliegen... in Przemysl – mir hat’s nachher so gegraust, daß ich gemeint hab’, nie wieder rühr’ ich ein Frauenzimmer an... Das war eine gräßliche Zeit da oben in Galizien... eigentlich ein Mordsglück, daß wir nach Wien gekommen sind. Der Bokorny sitzt noch immer in Sambor und kann noch zehn Jahr’ dort sitzen und alt und grau werden... Aber wenn ich dort geblieben wär’, wär’ mir das nicht passiert, was mir heut’ passiert ist... und ich möcht’ lieber in Galizien alt und grau werden, als daß... als was? Als was? – Ja, was ist denn? Was ist denn? – Bin ich denn wahnsinnig, daß ich das immer vergeß’? – Ja, meiner Seel’, vergessen tu’ ich’s jeden Moment... ist das schon je erhört worden, daß sich einer in ein paar Stunden eine Kugel durch’n Kopf jagen muß, und er denkt an alle möglichen Sachen, die ihn gar nichts mehr angeh’n? Meiner Seel’, mir ist geradeso, als wenn ich einen Rausch hätt’! Haha! Ein schöner Rausch! Ein Mordsrausch! Ein Selbstmordsrausch! – Ha! Witze mach’ ich, das ist sehr gut! – Ja, ganz gut aufgelegt bin ich – so was muß doch angeboren sein... Wahrhaftig, wenn ich’s einem erzählen möcht’, er würd’ es nicht glauben. – Mir scheint, wenn ich das Ding bei mir hätt’... Jetzt würd’ ich abdrücken – in einer Sekunde ist alles vorbei... Nicht jeder hat’s so gut – andere müssen sich monatelang plagen... meine arme Cousin’, zwei Jahr’ ist sie gelegen, hat sich nicht rühren können, hat die gräßlichsten Schmerzen g’habt – so ein Jammer!... Ist es nicht besser, wenn man das selber besorgt? Nur Obacht geben heißt’s, gut zielen, daß einem nicht am End’ das Malheur passiert, wie dem Kadett-Stellvertreter im vorigen Jahr... Der arme Teufel, gestorben ist er nicht, aber blind ist er geworden... Was mit dem nur geschehen ist? Wo er jetzt lebt? – Schrecklich, so herumlaufen, wie der – das heißt: herumlaufen kann er nicht, g’führt muß er werden – so ein junger Mensch, kann heut’ noch keine Zwanzig sein... seine Geliebte hat er besser getroffen... gleich war sie tot... Unglaublich, weswegen sich die Leut’ totschießen! Wie kann man überhaupt nur eifersüchtig sein?... Mein Lebtag hab’ ich so was nicht gekannt... Die Steffi ist jetzt gemütlich in der Gartenbaugesellschaft; dann geht sie mit »ihm« nach Haus... Nichts liegt mir d’ran, gar nichts! Hübsche Einrichtung hat sie – das kleine Badezimmer mit der roten Latern’. – Wie sie neulich in dem grünseidenen Schlafrock hereingekommen ist... den grünen Schlafrock werd’ ich auch nimmer seh’n – und die ganze Steffi auch nicht... und die schöne, breite Treppe in der Gußhausstraße werd’ ich auch nimmer hinaufgeh’n... Das Fräulein Steffi wird sich weiter amüsieren, als wenn gar nichts gescheh’n wär’... nicht einmal erzählen darf sie’s wem, daß ihr lieber Gustl sich umgebracht hat... Aber weinen wirds’ schon – ah ja, weinen wirds’... Überhaupt, weinen werden gar viele Leut’... Um Gottes willen, die Mama! – Nein, nein, daran darf ich nicht denken. – Ah, nein, daran darf absolut nicht gedacht werden... An Zuhaus wird nicht gedacht, Gustl, verstanden? – Nicht mit dem allerleisesten Gedanken...
Das ist nicht schlecht, jetzt bin ich gar im Prater... mitten in der Nacht... das hätt’ ich mir auch nicht gedacht in der Früh’, daß ich heut’ nacht im Prater spazieren geh’n werd’... Was sich der Sicherheitswachmann dort denkt?... Na, geh’n wir nur weiter... es ist ganz schön... Mit’m Nachtmahlen ist’s eh’ nichts, mit dem Kaffeehaus auch nichts; die Luft ist angenehm, und ruhig ist es.. sehr... Zwar, ruhig werd’ ich’s jetzt bald haben, so ruhig, als ich’s mir nur wünschen kann. Haha! – Aber ich bin ja ganz außer Atem... ich bin ja gerannt wie nicht g’scheit... langsamer, langsamer, Gustl, versäumst nichts, hast gar nichts mehr zu tun – gar nichts, aber absolut nichts mehr! – Mir scheint gar, ich fröstel’? – Es wird halt doch die Aufregung sein... dann hab’ ich ja nichts gegessen... Was riecht denn da so eigentümlich?... Es kann doch noch nichts blühen?... Was haben wir denn heut’? – Den vierten April... freilich, es hat viel geregnet in den letzten Tagen... aber die Bäume sind beinah’ noch ganz kahl und dunkel ist es, hu! Man könnt’ schier Angst kriegen Das ist eigentlich das einzigemal in meinem Leben, daß ich Furcht gehabt hab’, als kleiner Bub, damals im Wald... aber ich war ja gar nicht so klein... vierzehn oder fünfzehn... Wie lang’ ist das jetzt her? – Neun Jahr’... freilich – mit achtzehn war ich Stellvertreter, mit zwanzig Leutnant... und im nächsten Jahr werd’ ich... Was werd’ ich im nächsten Jahr? Was heißt das überhaupt: nächstes Jahr? Was heißt das: in der nächsten Woche? Was heißt das: übermorgen?... Wie? Zähneklappern? Oho! – Na, lassen wir’s nur ein biss’l klappern... Herr Leutnant, Sie sind jetzt allein, brauchen niemandem einen Pflanz vorzumachen... es ist bitter, es ist bitter...
Ich will mich auf die Bank setzen... Ah! – Wie weit bin ich denn da? – So eine Dunkelheit! Das da hinter mir, das muß das zweite Kaffeehaus sein.. bin ich im vorigen Sommer auch einmal gewesen, wie unsere Kapelle konzertiert hat... mit’m Kopetzky und mit’m Rüttner – noch ein paar waren dabei.. – Ich bin aber müd’... nein, ich bin müd’, als wenn ich einen Marsch von zehn Stunden gemacht hätt’... Ja, das wär’ sowas, da einschlafen. – Ha! Ein obdachloser Leutnant.. Ja, ich sollt’ doch eigentlich nach Haus... was tu’ ich denn zu Haus? Aber was tu’ ich denn im Prater? – Ah, mir wär’ am liebsten, ich müßt’ gar nicht aufsteh’n – da einschlafen und nimmer aufwachen... Ja, das wär’ halt bequem! – Nein, so bequem wird’s Ihnen nicht gemacht, Herr Leutnant.. Aber wie und wann? – Jetzt könnt’ ich mir doch endlich einmal die Geschichte ordentlich überlegen... überlegt muß ja all es werden... so ist es schon einmal im Leben... Also überlegen wir... Was denn?... – Nein, ist die Luft gut... man sollt’ öfters bei der Nacht in’ Prater geh’n... Ja, das hätt’ mir eben früher einfallen müssen, jetzt ist’s aus mit’m Prater, mit der Luft und mit’m Spazierengeh’n... Ja, also was ist denn? – Ah, fort mit dem Kappl; mir scheint, das drückt mir aufs Gehirn... ich kann ja gar nicht ordentlich denken... Ah... so!... Also jetzt Verstand zusammennehmen, Gustl... letzte Verfügungen treffen! Also morgen früh wird Schluß gemacht... morgen früh um sieben Uhr... sieben Uhr ist eine schöne Stund’. Haha! – Also um acht, wenn die Schul’ anfangt, ist alles vorbei... der Kopetzky wird aber keine Schul’ halten können, weil er zu sehr erschüttert sein wird... Aber vielleicht weiß er’s noch gar nicht... man braucht ja nichts zu hören... Den Max Lippay haben sie auch erst am Nachmittag gefunden, und in der Früh’ hat er sich erschossen, und kein Mensch hat was davon gehört... Aber was geht mich das an, ob der Kopetzky Schul’ halten wird oder nicht?... Ha! – Also um sieben Uhr! – Ja... na, was denn noch?... Weiter ist ja nichts zu überlegen. Im Zimmer schieß’ ich mich tot, und dann is basta! Montag ist die Leich’... Einen kenn’ ich, der wird eine Freud’ haben: das ist der Doktor... Duell kann nicht stattfinden wegen Selbstmord des einen Kombattanten... Was sie bei Mannheimers sagen werden? – Na, er wird sich nicht viel d’raus machen... aber die Frau, die hübsche, blonde... mit der war was zu machen... O ja, mir scheint, bei der hätt’ ich Chance gehabt, wenn ich mich nur ein bissl zusammengenommen hätt’... Ja, das wär’ doch was anders gewesen, als die Steffi, dieses Mensch... Aber faul darf man halt nicht sein... da heißt’s: Cour machen, Blumen schicken, vernünftig reden... das geht nicht so, daß man sagt: Komm’ morgen nachmittag zu mir in die Kasern’!... Ja, so eine anständige Frau, das wär’ halt was g’wesen... Die Frau von meinem Hauptmann in Przemysl, das war ja doch keine anständige Frau... ich könnt’ schwören: der Libitzky und der Wermutek und der schäbige Stellvertreter, der hat sie auch g’habt... Aber die Frau Mannheimer... Ja, das wär’ was anders, das wär’ doch auch ein Umgang gewesen, das hätt’ einen beinah’ zu einem andern Menschen gemacht – da hätt’ man doch noch einen andern Schliff gekriegt – da hätt’ man einen Respekt vor sich selber haben dürfen. – – Aber ewig diese Menscher... und so jung hab’ ich angefangen – ein Bub war ich ja noch, wie ich damals den ersten Urlaub gehabt hab’ und in Graz bei den Eltern zu Haus war... der Riedl war auch dabei – eine Böhmin ist es gewesen... die muß doppelt so alt gewesen sein wie ich – in der Früh bin ich erst nach Haus gekommen... Wie mich der Vater angeschaut hat... und die Klara... Vor der Klara hab’ ich mich am meisten g’schämt... Damals war sie verlobt... warum ist denn nichts d’raus geworden? Ich hab’ mich eigentlich nicht viel d’rum gekümmert... Armes Hascherl, hat auch nie Glück gehabt – und jetzt verliert sie noch den einzigen Bruder... Ja, wirst mich nimmer seh’n, Klara – aus! Was, das hast du dir nicht gedacht, Schwesterl, wie du mich am Neujahrstag zur Bahn begleitet hast, daß du mich nie wieder seh’n wirst? – Und die Mama... Herrgott, die Mama... nein, ich darf daran nicht denken... wenn ich daran denk’, bin ich imstand’, eine Gemeinheit zu begehen... Ah... wenn ich zuerst noch nach Haus fahren möcht’... sagen, es ist ein Urlaub auf einen Tag... noch einmal den Papa, die Mama, die Klara seh’n, bevor ich einen Schluß mach’... Ja, mit dem ersten Zug um sieben kann ich nach Graz fahren, um eins bin ich dort... Grüß dich Gott, Mama... Servus, Klara! Na, wie geht’s euch denn?... Nein, das ist eine Überraschung!... Aber sie möchten was merken... wenn niemand anders... die Klara... die Klara gewiß... Die Klara ist ein so gescheites Mädel... Wie lieb sie mir neulich geschrieben hat, und ich bin ihr noch immer die Antwort schuldig – und die guten Ratschläge, die sie mir immer gibt... ein so seelengutes Geschöpf... Ob nicht alles ganz anders geworden wär’, wenn ich zu Haus geblieben wär’? Ich hätt’ Ökonomie studiert, wär’ zum Onkel gegangen... sie haben’s ja alle wollen, wie ich noch ein Bub war... Jetzt wär’ ich am End’ schon verheiratet, ein liebes, gutes Mädel... vielleicht die Anna, die hat mich so gern gehabt... auch jetzt hab’ ich’s noch gemerkt, wie ich das letztemal zu Haus war, obzwar sie schon einen Mann hat und zwei Kinder... ich hab’s g’sehn’, wie sie mich angeschaut hat... Und noch immer sagt sie mir »Gustl« wie früher... Der wird’s ordentlich in die Glieder fahren, wenn sie erfährt, was es mit mir für ein End’ genommen hat – aber ihr Mann wird sagen: Das hab’ ich vorausgesehen – so ein Lump! – Alle werden meinen, es ist, weil ich Schulden gehabt hab’... und es ist doch gar nicht wahr, es ist doch alles gezahlt... nur die letzten hundertsechzig Gulden – na, und die sind morgen da... Ja, dafür muß ich auch noch sorgen, daß der Ballert die hundertsechzig Gulden kriegt... das muß ich niederschreiben, bevor ich mich erschieß’... Es ist schrecklich, es ist schrecklich!... Wenn ich lieber auf und davon fahren möcht’ – nach Amerika, wo mich niemand kennt... In Amerika weiß kein Mensch davon, was hier heut’ abend gescheh’n ist... da kümmert sich kein Mensch d’rum... Neulich ist in der Zeitung gestanden von einem Grafen Runge, der hat fortmüssen wegen einer schmutzigen Geschichte, und jetzt hat er drüben ein Hotel und pfeift auf den ganzen Schwindel... Und in ein paar Jahren könnt’ man ja wieder zurück... nicht nach Wien natürlich... auch nicht nach Graz... aber aufs Gut könnt’ ich... und der Mama und dem Papa und der Klara möcht’s doch tausendmal lieber sein, wenn ich nur lebendig blieb’... Und was geh’n mich denn die andern Leut’ an? Wer meint’s denn sonst gut mit mir? – Außer’m Kopetzky könnt’ ich allen gestohlen werden... der Kopetzky ist doch der einzige... Und grad der hat mir heut’ das Billett geben müssen... und das Billett ist an allem schuld... ohne das Billett wär’ ich nicht ins Konzert gegangen, und alles das wär’ nicht passiert... Was ist denn nur passiert?... Es ist grad, als wenn hundert Jahr’ seitdem vergangen wären, und es kann noch keine zwei Stunden sein... Vor zwei Stunden hat mir einer »dummer Bub« gesagt und hat meinen Säbel zerbrechen wollen... Herrgott, ich fang’ noch zu schreien an mitten in der Nacht! Warum ist denn das alles gescheh’n? Hätt’ ich nicht länger warten können, bis’s ganz leer wird in der Garderobe? Und warum hab’ ich ihm denn nur gesagt: »Halten Sie’s Maul!«? Wie ist mir denn das nur ausgerutscht? Ich bin doch sonst ein höflicher Mensch... nicht einmal mit meinem Burschen bin ich sonst so grob... aber natürlich, nervos bin ich gewesen – alle die Sachen, die da zusammengekommen sind... das Pech im Spiel und die ewige Absagerei von der Steffi – und das Duell morgen nachmittag – und zu wenig schlafen tu’ ich in der letzten Zeit – und die Rackerei in der Kasern’ – das halt’t man auf die Dauer nicht aus!... Ja, über kurz oder lang wär’ ich krank geworden – hätt’ um einen Urlaub einkommen müssen... Jetzt ist es nicht mehr notwendig – jetzt kommt ein langer Urlaub – mit Karenz der Gebühren – haha!...
Wie lang werd’ ich denn da noch sitzen bleiben? Es muß Mitternacht vorbei sein... hab’ ich’s nicht früher schlagen hören? – Was ist denn das... ein Wagen fährt da? Um die Zeit? Gummiradler – kann mir schon denken... Die haben’s besser wie ich – vielleicht ist es der Ballert mit der Bertha... Warum soll’s grad der Ballert sein? – Fahr’ nur zu! – Ein hübsches Zeug’l hat Seine Hoheit in Pzremysl gehabt... mit dem ist er immer in die Stadt hinunterg’fahren zu der Rosenberg... Sehr leutselig war Seine Hoheit – ein echter Kamerad, mit allen auf du und du.. War doch eine schöne Zeit.. obzwar... die Gegend war trostlos und im Sommer zum Verschmachten... an einem Nachmittag sind einmal drei vom Sonnenstich getroffen worden... auch der Korporal von meinem Zug – ein so verwendbarer Mensch... Nachmittag haben wir uns nackt aufs Bett hingelegt. – Einmal ist plötzlich der Wiesner zu mir hereingekommen; ich muß grad geträumt haben und steh’ auf und zieh’ den Säbel, der neben mir liegt... muß gut ausgeschaut haben... der Wiesner hat sich halbtot gelacht – der ist jetzt schon Rittmeister... – Schad’, daß ich nicht zur Kavallerie gegangen bin... aber das hat der Alte nicht wollen – wär’ ein zu teurer Spaß gewesen – jetzt ist es ja doch alles eins... Warum denn? – ja, ich... ich weiß schon: sterben muß ich, darum ist es alles eins – sterben muß ich... Also wie? – Schau, Gustl, du bist doch extra da herunter in den Prater gegangen, mitten in der Nacht, wo dich keine Menschenseele stört – jetzt kannst du dir alles ruhig überlegen... Das ist ja lauter Unsinn mit Amerika und quittieren, und du bist ja viel zu dumm, um was anderes anzufangen – und wenn du hundert Jahr’ alt wirst, und du denkst d’ran, daß dir einer hat den Säbel zerbrechen wollen und dich einen dummen Buben g’heißen, und du bist dag’standen und hast nichts tun können – nein, zu überlegen ist da gar nichts – gescheh’n ist gescheh’n – auch das mit der Mama und mit der Klara ist ein Unsinn – die werden’s schon verschmerzen – man verschmerzt alles... Wie hat die Mama gejammert, wie ihr Bruder gestorben ist – und nach vier Wochen hat sie kaum mehr d’ran gedacht... auf den Friedhof ist sie hinausgefahren... zuerst alle Wochen, dann alle Monat’ – und jetzt nur mehr am Todestag. – – Morgen ist mein Todestag – fünfter April. – – Ob sie mich nach Graz überführen? Haha! Da werden die Würmer in Graz eine Freud’ haben! – Aber das geht mich nichts an – darüber sollen sich die andern den Kopf zerbrechen... Also, was geht mich denn eigentlich an?... Ja, die hundertsechzig Gulden für den Ballert – das ist alles – weiter brauch’ ich keine Verfügungen zu treffen. – Briefe schreiben? Wozu denn? An wen denn?... Abschied nehmen? – Ja, zum Teufel hinein, das ist doch deutlich genug, wenn man sich totschießt! – Dann merken’s die andern schon, daß man Abschied genommen hat... Wenn die Leut’ wüßten, wie egal mir die ganze Geschichte ist, möchten sie mich gar nicht bedauern – ist eh’ nicht schad’ um mich... Und was hab’ ich denn vom ganzen Leben gehabt? – Etwas hätt’ ich gern noch mitgemacht: einen Krieg – aber da hätt’ ich lang’ warten können... Und alles übrige kenn’ ich... Ob so ein Mensch Steffi oder Kunigunde heißt, bleibt sich gleich. – – Und die schönsten Operetten kenn’ ich auch – und im ›Lohengrin‹ bin ich zwölfmal d’rin gewesen – und heut’ abend war ich sogar bei einem Oratorium – und ein Bäckermeister hat mich einen dummen Buben geheißen – meiner Seel’, es ist grad’ genug! – Und ich bin gar nimmer neugierig... – Also geh’n wir nach Haus, langsam, ganz langsam... Eile hab’ ich ja wirklich keine. – Noch ein paar Minuten ausruhen da im Prater, auf einer Bank – obdachlos. – Ins Bett leg’ ich mich ja doch nimmer – hab’ ja genug Zeit zum Ausschlafen. – – Ah, die Luft! – Die wird mir abgeh’n...
 
Was ist denn? – He, Johann, bringen S’ mir ein Glas frisches Wasser... Was ist?... Wo ja, träum’ ich denn?... Mein Schädel... o, Donnerwetter... Fischamend... Ich bring’ die Augen nicht auf! – Ich bin ja angezogen! – Wo sitz’ ich denn? – Heiliger Himmel, eingeschlafen bin ich! Wie hab’ ich denn nur schlafen können; es dämmert ja schon! – Wie lang’ hab’ ich denn geschlafen? – Muß auf die Uhr schau’n... Ich seh’ nichts? Wo sind denn meine Zündhölzeln?... Na, brennt eins an? Drei... und ich soll mich um vier duellieren – nein, nicht duellieren – totschießen soll ich mich! – Es ist gar nichts mit dem Duell; ich muß mich totschießen, weil ein Bäckermeister mich einen dummen Buben genannt hat... Ja, ist es denn wirklich g’scheh’n? – Mir ist im Kopf so merkwürdig... wie in einem Schraubstock ist mein Hals – ich kann mich gar nicht rühren – das rechte Bein ist eingeschlafen. – Aufsteh’n! Aufsteh’n! Ah, so ist es besser! – Es wird schon lichter... Und die Luft ganz wie damals in der Früh’, wie ich auf Vorposten war und im Wald kampiert hab’... Das war ein anderes Aufwachen – da war ein anderer Tag vor mir.. Mir scheint, ich glaub’s noch nicht recht. – Da liegt die Straße, grau, leer – ich bin jetzt sicher der einzige Mensch im Prater. – Um vier Uhr früh war ich schon einmal herunten, mit’m Pausinger – geritten sind wir – ich auf dem Pferd vom Hauptmann Mirovic und der Pausinger auf seinem eigenen Krampen – das war im Mai, im vorigen Jahr – da hat schon alles geblüht – alles war grün. Jetzt ist’s noch kahl – aber der Frühling kommt bald – in ein paar Tagen ist er schon da. – Maiglöckerln, Veigerln – schad’, daß ich nichts mehr davon haben werd’ – jeder Schubiak hat was davon, und ich muß sterben! Es ist ein Elend! Und die andern werden im Weingartl sitzen beim Nachtmahl, als wenn gar nichts g’wesen wär’ – so wie wir alle im Weingartl g’sessen sind, noch am Abend nach dem Tag, wo sie den Lippay hinausgetragen haben... Und der Lippay war so beliebt... sie haben ihn lieber g’habt, als mich, beim Regiment – warum sollen sie denn nicht im Weingartl sitzen, wenn ich abkratz’? – Ganz warm ist es – viel wärmer als gestern – und so ein Duft – es muß doch schon blühen... Ob die Steffi mir Blumen bringen wird? – Aber fallt ihr ja gar nicht ein! Die wird grad hinausfahren... Ja, wenn’s noch die Adel’ wär’.. Nein, die Adel’! Mir scheint, seit zwei Jahren hab’ ich an die nicht mehr gedacht... Was die für G’schichten gemacht hat, wie’s aus war... mein Lebtag hab’ ich kein Frauenzimmer so weinen geseh’n... Das war doch eigentlich das Hübscheste, was ich erlebt hab’... So bescheiden, so anspruchslos, wie die war – die hat mich gern gehabt, da könnt’ ich d’rauf schwören. – War doch was ganz anderes, als die Steffi... Ich möcht’ nur wissen, warum ich die aufgegeben hab’... so eine Eselei! Zu fad ist es mir geworden, ja, das war das Ganze... So jeden Abend mit ein und derselben ausgeh’n... Dann hab’ ich eine Angst g’habt, daß ich überhaupt nimmer loskomm’ – eine solche Raunzen – – Na, Gustl, hätt’st schon noch warten können – war doch die einzige, die dich gern gehabt hat... Was sie jetzt macht? Na, was wird’s machen? – Jetzt wird’s halt einen andern haben... Freilich, das mit der Steffi ist bequemer – wenn man nur gelegentlich engagiert ist und ein anderer hat die ganzen Unannehmlichkeiten, und ich hab’ nur das Vergnügen... Ja, da kann man auch nicht verlangen, daß sie auf den Friedhof hinauskommt... Wer ging’ denn überhaupt mit, wenn er nicht müßt’! – Vielleicht der Kopetzky, und dann wär’ Rest! – Ist doch traurig, so gar niemanden zu haben...
Aber so ein Unsinn! Der Papa und die Mama und die Klara... Ja, ich bin halt der Sohn, der Bruder... aber was ist denn weiter zwischen uns? Gern haben sie mich ja – aber was wissen sie denn von mir? – Daß ich meinen Dienst mach’, daß ich Karten spiel’ und daß ich mit Menschern herumlauf... aber sonst? – Daß mich manchmal selber vor mir graust, das hab’ ich ihnen ja doch nicht geschrieben – na, mir scheint, ich hab’s auch selber gar nicht recht gewußt. – Ah was, kommst du jetzt mit solchen Sachen, Gustl? Fehlt nur noch, daß zu zum Weinen anfangst... pfui Teufel! – Ordentlich Schritt... so! Ob man zu einem Rendezvous geht oder auf Posten oder in die Schlacht... wer hat das nur gesagt?... Ah ja, der Major Lederer, in der Kantin’, wie man von dem Wingleder erzählt hat, der so blaß geworden ist vor seinem ersten Duell – und gespieben hat... Ja: ob man zu einem Rendezvous geht oder in den sicher’n Tod, am Gang und am G’sicht laßt sich das der richtige Offizier nicht anerkennen! – Also Gustl – der Major Lederer hat’s g’sagt! Ha! –
Immer lichter... man könnt’ schon lesen... Was pfeift denn da?... Ah, drüben ist der Nordbahnhof... Die Tegetthoffsäule... so lang’ hat sie noch nie ausg’schaut Da drüben stehen Wagen... Aber nichts als Straßenkehrer auf der Straße... meine letzten Straßenkehrer – ha! Ich muß immer lachen, wenn ich d’ran denk’... das versteh’ ich gar nicht... Ob das bei allen Leuten so ist, wenn sie’s einmal ganz sicher wissen? Halb vier auf der Nordbahnuhr... Jetzt ist nur die Frage, ob ich mich um sieben nach Bahnzeit oder nach Wiener Zeit erschieß?... Sieben... Ja, warum grad’ sieben?... Als wenn’s gar nicht anders sein könnt’... Hunger hab’ ich – meiner Seel’, ich hab’ Hunger – kein Wunder... seit wann hab’ ich denn nichts gegessen?... Seit – seit gestern sechs Uhr abends im Kaffeehaus... Ja! Wie mir der Kopetzky das Billett gegeben hat – eine Melange und zwei Kipfel. – Was der Bäckermeister sagen wird, wenn er’s erfahrt?... Der verfluchte Hund! – Ah, der wird wissen, warum – dem wird der Knopf aufgeh’n – der wird draufkommen, was es heißt: Offizier! – So ein Kerl kann sich auf offener Straße prügeln lassen, und es hat keine Folgen, und unsereiner wird unter vier Augen insultiert und ist ein toter Mann... Wenn sich so ein Fallot wenigstens schlagen möcht’ – aber nein, da wär’ er ja vorsichtiger, da möcht’ er sowas nicht riskieren... Und der Kerl lebt weiter, ruhig weiter, während ich – krepieren muß! – Der hat mich doch umgebracht... Ja, Gustl, merkst d’ was? – Der ist es, der dich umbringt! Aber so glatt soll’s ihm doch nicht ausgeh’n! – Nein, nein, nein! Ich werd’ dem Kopetzky einen Brief schreiben, wo alles drinsteht, die ganze G’schicht’ schreib’ ich auf... oder noch besser: ich schreib’s dem Obersten, ich mach’ eine Meldung ans Regimentskommando... ganz wie eine dienstliche Meldung... Ja, wart’, du glaubst, daß sowas geheim bleiben kann? – Du irrst dich – aufgeschrieben wird’s zum ewigen Gedächtnis, und dann möcht’ ich sehen, ob du dich noch ins Kaffeehaus traust! – Ha! – »Das möcht’ ich sehen« ist gut!... Ich möcht’ noch manches gern seh’n, wird nur leider nicht möglich sein – aus is! –
Jetzt kommt der Johann in mein Zimmer, jetzt merkt er, daß der Herr Leutnant nicht zu Haus geschlafen hat. – Na, alles mögliche wird er sich denken; aber daß der Herr Leutnant im Prater übernachtet hat, das, meiner Seel’, das nicht... Ah, die Vierundvierziger! Zur Schießstätte marschieren s’ – lassen wir sie vorübergeh’n... so stellen wir uns da her... – Da oben wird ein Fenster aufgemacht – hübsche Person – na, ich möcht’ mir wenigstens ein Tüchel umnehmen, wenn ich zum Fenster geh’... Vorigen Sonntag war’s zum letztenmal... Daß grad’ die Steffi die letzte sein wird, hab’ ich mir nicht träumen lassen. – Ach Gott, das ist doch das einzige reelle Vergnügen... Na ja, der Herr Oberst wird in zwei Stunden nobel nachreiten... die Herren haben’s gut – ja, ja, rechts g’schaut! – Ist schon gut... Wenn ihr wüßtet, wie ich auf euch pfeif! – Ah, das ist nicht schlecht: der Katzer... seit wann ist denn der zu den Vierundvierzigern übersetzt? – Servus, servus! – Was der für ein G’sicht macht?... Warum deut’ er denn auf seinen Kopf? – Mein Lieber, dein Schädel interessiert mich sehr wenig... Ah, so! Nein, mein Lieber, du irrst dich: im Prater hab’ ich übernachtet... wirst schon heut’ im Abendblatt lesen. – »Nicht möglich!« wird er sagen; »heut’ früh, wie wir zur Schießstätte ausgerückt sind, hab’ ich ihn noch auf der Praterstraße getroffen!« – Wer wird denn meinen Zug kriegen? – Ob sie ihn dem Walterer geben werden? – Na, da wird was Schönes herauskommen – ein Kerl ohne Schneid, der hätt’ auch lieber Schuster werden sollen... Was, geht schon die Sonne auf? – Das wird heut’ ein schöner Tag – so ein rechter Frühlingstag... Ist doch eigentlich zum Teufelholen! – Der Komfortabelkutscher wird noch um achte in der Früh’ auf der Welt sein, und ich... na, was ist denn das? He, das wär’ sowas – noch im letzten Moment die Contenance verlieren wegen einem Komfortabelkutscher... Was ist denn das, daß ich auf einmal so ein blödes Herzklopfen krieg’? – Das wird doch nicht deswegen sein... Nein, o nein... es ist, weil ich so lang’ nichts gegessen hab’. – – Aber Gustl, sei doch aufrichtig mit dir selber: – Angst hast du – Angst, weil du’s noch nie probiert hast... Aber das hilft dir ja nichts, die Angst hat noch keinem was geholfen, jeder muß es einmal durchmachen, der eine früher, der andere später, und du kommst halt früher d’ran... Viel wert bist du ja nie gewesen, so benimm dich wenigstens anständig zu guter Letzt, das verlang’ ich von dir! – So, jetzt heißt’s nur überlegen – aber was denn?... Immer will ich mir was überlegen... ist doch ganz einfach: – im Nachtkastelladel liegt er, geladen ist er auch, heißt’s nur: losdrucken – das wird doch keine Kunst sein! – –
Die geht schon ins G’schäft... die armen Mädeln! Die Adel’ war auch in einem G’schäft – ein paarmal hab’ ich sie am Abend abg’holt... Wenn sie in einem G’schäft sind, werd’n sie doch keine solchen Menscher... Wenn die Steffi mir allein g’hören möcht’, ich ließ sie Modistin werden oder sowas... Wie wird sie’s denn erfahren? – Aus der Zeitung!... Sie wird sich ärgern, daß ich ihr’s nicht geschrieben hab’... Mir scheint, ich schnapp’ doch noch über... Was geht denn das mich an, ob sie sich ärgert... Wie lang’ hat denn die ganze G’schicht gedauert?... Seit’m Jänner?... Ah nein, es muß doch schon vor Weihnachten gewesen sein... ich hab’ ihr ja aus Graz Zuckerln mitgebracht, und zu Neujahr hat sie mir ein Brieferl g’schickt... Richtig, die Briefe, die ich zu Haus hab’, – sind keine da, die ich verbrennen sollt’?... Hm, der vom Fallsteiner – wenn man den Brief findet... der Bursch könnt’ Unannehmlichkeiten haben... Was mir das schon aufliegt! – Na, es ist ja keine große Anstrengung... aber hervorsuchen kann ich den Wisch nicht... Das beste ist, ich verbrenn’ alles zusammen... wer braucht’s denn? Ist lauter Makulatur. – – Und meine paar Bücher könnt’ ich dem Blany vermachen. – ›Durch Nacht und Eis‹... schad’, daß ich’s nimmer auslesen kann... bin wenig zum Lesen gekommen in der letzten Zeit... Orgel – ah, aus der Kirche... Frühmesse – bin schon lang’ bei keiner gewesen... das letztemal im Feber, wie mein Zug dazu kommandiert war... Aber das galt nichts – ich hab’ auf meine Leut’ aufgepaßt, ob sie andächtig sind und sich ordentlich benehmen... – Möcht’ in die Kirche hineingeh’n... am End’ ist doch was d’ran... – Na, heut’ nach Tisch werd’ ich’s schon genau wissen... Ah, »nach Tisch« ist sehr gut!... Also, was ist, soll ich hineingeh’n? – Ich glaub’, der Mama wär’s ein Trost, wenn sie das wüßt’!... Die Klara gibt weniger d’rauf... Na, geh’n wir hinein – schaden kann’s ja nicht!
Orgel – Gesang – hm! – Was ist denn das? – Mir ist ganz schwindlig... O Gott, o Gott, o Gott! Ich möcht’ einen Menschen haben, mit dem ich ein Wort reden könnt’ vorher! – Das wär’ so was – zur Beicht’ geh’n! Der möcht’ Augen machen, der Pfaff’, wenn ich zum Schluß sagen möcht’: Habe die Ehre, Hochwürden; jetzt geh’ ich mich umbringen!... – Am liebsten läg’ ich da auf dem Steinboden und tät’ heulen... Ah nein, das darf man nicht tun! Aber weinen tut manchmal so gut... Setzen wir uns einen Moment – aber nicht wieder einschlafen wie im Prater!... – Die Leut’, die eine Religion haben, sind doch besser d’ran... Na, jetzt fangen mir gar die Händ’ zu zittern an!... Wenn’s so weitergeht, werd’ ich mir selber auf die Letzt’ so ekelhaft, daß ich mich vor lauter Schand’ umbring’! – Das alte Weib da – um was betet denn die noch?... Wär’ eine Idee, wenn ich ihr sagen möcht’: Sie, schließen Sie mich auch ein... ich hab’ das nicht ordentlich gelernt, wie man das macht... Ha! Mir scheint, das Sterben macht blöd’! – Aufsteh’n! – Woran erinnert mich denn nur die Melodie? – Heiliger Himmel! Gestern abend! – Fort, fort! Das halt’ ich gar nicht aus!... Pst! Keinen solchen Lärm, nicht mit dem Säbel scheppern – die Leut’ nicht in der Andacht stören – so! – doch besser im Freien... Licht... Ah, es kommt immer näher – wenn es lieber schon vorbei wär’! – Ich hätt’s gleich tun sollen – im Prater... man sollt’ nie ohne Revolver ausgeh’n... Hätt’ ich gestern abend einen gehabt... Herrgott noch einmal! – In das Kaffeehaus könnt’ ich geh’n frühstücken... Hunger hab’ ich... Früher ist’s mir immer sonderbar vorgekommen, daß die Leut’, die verurteilt sind, in der Früh’ noch ihren Kaffee trinken und ihr Zigarrl rauchen... Donnerwetter, geraucht hab’ ich gar nicht! Gar keine Lust zum Rauchen! – Es ist komisch: ich hätt’ Lust, in mein Kaffeehaus zu geh’n... Ja, aufgesperrt ist schon, und von uns ist jetzt doch keiner dort – und wenn schon... ist höchstens ein Zeichen von Kaltblütigkeit. »Um sechs hat er noch im Kaffeehaus gefrühstückt, und um sieben hat er sich erschossen«... – Ganz ruhig bin ich wieder... das Gehen ist so angenehm – und das Schönste ist, daß mich keiner zwingt. – Wenn ich wollt’ könnt’ ich noch immer den ganzen Krempel hinschmeißen... Amerika... Was ist das: »Krempel«? Was ist ein »Krempel«? Mir scheint, ich hab’ den Sonnenstich!... Oho, bin ich vielleicht deshalb so ruhig, weil ich mir noch immer einbild’, ich muß nicht?... Ich muß! Ich muß! Nein, ich will! – Kannst du dir denn überhaupt vorstellen, Gustl, daß du dir die Uniform ausziehst und durchgehst? Und der verfluchte Hund lacht sich den Buckel voll – und der Kopetzky selbst möcht’ dir nicht mehr die Hand geben... Mir kommt vor, ich bin jetzt ganz rot geworden. – – Der Wachmann salutiert mir... ich muß danken... »Servus!« – Jetzt hab’ ich gar »Servus« gesagt!... Das freut so einen armen Teufel immer... Na, über mich hat sich keiner zu beklagen gehabt – außer Dienst war ich immer gemütlich. – Wie wir auf Manöver waren, hab’ ich den Chargen von der Kompagnie Britannikas geschenkt; – einmal hab’ ich gehört, wie ein Mann hinter mir bei den Gewehrgriffen was von »verfluchter Rackerei« g’sagt hat, und ich hab’ ihn nicht zum Rapport geschickt – ich hab’ ihm nur gesagt: »Sie, passen S’ auf, das könnt’ einmal wer anderer hören – da ging’s Ihnen schlecht!«... Der Burghof... Wer ist denn heut’ auf Wach’? – Die Bosniaken – schau’n gut aus – der Oberstleutnant hat neulich g’sagt: Wie wir im 78er Jahr unten waren, hätt’ keiner geglaubt, daß uns die einmal so parieren werden!... Herrgott, bei so was hätt’ ich dabei sein mögen! – Da steh’n sie alle auf von der Bank. – Servus, servus! – Das ist halt zuwider, daß unsereiner nicht dazu kommt. – Wär’ doch schöner gewesen, auf dem Feld der Ehre, fürs Vaterland, als so... Ja, Herr Doktor, Sie kommen eigentlich gut weg!... Ob das nicht einer für mich übernehmen könnt’? – Meiner Seel’, das sollt’ ich hinterlassen, daß sich der Kopetzky oder der Wymetal an meiner Statt mit dem Kerl schlagen... Ah, so leicht sollt’ der doch nicht davonkommen! – Ah, was! Ist das nicht egal, was nachher geschieht? Ich erfahr’s ja doch nimmer! – Da schlagen die Bäume aus... Im Volksgarten hab’ ich einmal eine angesprochen – ein rotes Kleid hat sie angehabt – in der Strozzigasse hat sie gewohnt – nachher hat sie der Rochlitz übernommen... Mir scheint, er hat sie noch immer, aber er red’t nichts mehr davon – er schämt sich vielleicht... Jetzt schlaft die Steffi noch... so lieb sieht sie aus, wenn sie schlaft... als wenn sie nicht bis fünf zählen könnt’! – Na, wenn sie schlafen, schau’n sie alle so aus! – Ich sollt’ ihr doch noch ein Wort schreiben... warum denn nicht? Es tut’s ja doch ein jeder, daß er vorher noch Briefe schreibt. – Auch der Klara sollt’ ich schreiben, daß sie den Papa und die Mama tröstet – und was man halt so schreibt! – und dem Kopetzky doch auch... Meiner Seel’, mir kommt vor, es wär’ viel leichter, wenn man ein paar Leuten Adieu gesagt hätt’... Und die Anzeige an das Regimentskommando – und die hundertsechzig Gulden für den Ballert... eigentlich noch viel zu tun... Na, es hat’s mir ja keiner g’schafft, daß ich’s um sieben tu’... von acht an ist noch immer Zeit genug zum Totsein!... Totsein, ja – so heißt’s – da kann man nichts machen...
Ringstraße – jetzt bin ich ja bald in meinem Kaffeehaus... Mir scheint gar, ich freu’ mich aufs Frühstück... es ist nicht zum glauben. – – Ja, nach dem Frühstück zünd’ ich mir eine Zigarr’ an, und dann geh’ ich nach Haus und schreib’... Ja, vor allem mach’ ich die Anzeige ans Kommando; dann kommt der Brief an die Klara – dann an den Kopetzky – dann an die Steffi... Was soll ich denn dem Luder schreiben... »Mein liebes Kind, Du hast wohl nicht gedacht«... Ah, was, Unsinn! – »Mein liebes Kind, ich danke Dir sehr«... – »Mein liebes Kind, bevor ich von hinnen gehe, will ich es nicht verabsäumen«... – Na, Briefschreiben war auch nie meine starke Seite... »Mein liebes Kind, ein letztes Lebewohl von Deinem Gustl«... – Die Augen, die sie machen wird! Ist doch ein Glück, daß ich nicht in sie verliebt war... das muß traurig sein, wenn man eine gern hat und so... Na, Gustl, sei gut: so ist es auch traurig genug... Nach der Steffi wär’ ja noch manche andere gekommen, und am End’ auch eine, die was wert ist – junges Mädel aus guter Familie mit Kaution – es wär’ ganz schön gewesen... – Der Klara muß ich ausführlich schreiben, daß ich nicht hab’ anders können... »Du mußt mir verzeihen, liebe Schwester, und bitte, tröste auch die lieben Eltern. Ich weiß, daß ich Euch allen manche Sorge gemacht habe und manchen Schmerz bereitet; aber glaube mir, ich habe Euch alle immer sehr lieb gehabt, und ich hoffe, Du wirst noch einmal glücklich werden, meine liebe Klara, und Deinen unglücklichen Bruder nicht ganz vergessene... Ah, ich schreib’ ihr lieber gar nicht!... Nein, da wird mir zum Weinen... es beißt mich ja schon in den Augen, wenn ich d’ran denk’... Höchstens dem Kopetzky schreib’ ich – ein kameradschaftliches Lebewohl, und er soll’s den andern ausrichten... – Ist’s schon sechs? – Ah, nein: halb – dreiviertel. – Ist das ein liebes G’sichtel!... Der kleine Fratz mit den schwarzen Augen, den ich so oft in der Florianigasse treff! – Was die sagen wird? – Aber die weiß ja gar nicht, wer ich bin – die wird sich nur wundern, daß sie mich nimmer sieht... Vorgestern hab’ ich mir vorgenommen, das nächstemal sprech’ ich sie an. – Kokettiert hat sie genug... so jung war die – am End’ war die gar noch eine Unschuld!... Ja, Gustl! Was du heute kannst besorgen, das verschiebe nicht auf morgen!... Der da hat sicher auch die ganze Nacht nicht geschlafen. – Na, jetzt wird er schön nach Haus geh’n und sich niederlegen – ich auch! – Haha! Jetzt wird’s ernst, Gustl, ja!... Na, wenn nicht einmal das biss’l Grausen wär’, so wär’ ja schon gar nichts d’ran – und im ganzen, ich muß’s schon selber sagen, halt’ ich mich brav... Ah, wohin denn noch? Da ist ja schon mein Kaffeehaus... auskehren tun sie noch... Na, geh’n wir hinein...
Da hinten ist der Tisch, wo die immer Tarock spielen... Merkwürdig, ich kann mir’s gar nicht vorstellen, daß der Kerl, der immer da hinten sitzt an der Wand, derselbe sein soll, der mich... – Kein Mensch ist noch da... Wo ist denn der Kellner?... He! Da kommt er aus der Küche... er schlieft schnell in den Frack hinein... Ist wirklich nimmer notwendig!... Ah, für ihn schon... er muß heut’ noch andere Leut’ bedienen!
»Habe die Ehre, Herr Leutnant!«
»Guten Morgen.«
»So früh heute, Herr Leutnant?«
»Ah, lassen S’ nur – ich hab’ nicht viel Zeit, ich kann mit’m Mantel dasitzen.«
»Was befehlen Herr Leutnant?«
»Eine Melange mit Haut.«
»Bitte gleich, Herr Leutnant!«
Ah, da liegen ja Zeitungen... schon heutige Zeitungen?... Ob schon was drinsteht?... Was denn? – Mir scheint, ich will nachseh’n, ob drinsteht, daß ich mich umgebracht hab’! Haha! – Warum steh’ ich denn noch immer?... Setzen wir uns da zum Fenster... Er hat mir ja schon die Melange hingestellt... So, den Vorhang zieh’ ich zu; es ist mir zuwider, wenn die Leut’ hereingucken.. Es geht zwar noch keiner vorüber... Ah, gut schmeckt der Kaffee – doch kein leerer Wahn, das Frühstücken!... Ah, ein ganz anderer Mensch wird man – der ganze Blödsinn ist, daß ich nicht genachtmahlt hab’. . . Was steht denn der Kerl schon wieder da? – Ah, die Semmeln hat er mir gebracht...
»Haben Herr Leutnant schon gehört?«...
»Was denn?« Ja, um Gotteswillen, weiß der schon was?... Aber, Unsinn, es ist ja nicht möglich!
»Den Herrn Habetswallner...«
Was? So heißt ja der Bäckermeister... was wird der jetzt sagen?... Ist der am End’ schon dagewesen? Ist er am End’ gestern schon dagewesen und hat’s erzählt?... Warum red’t er denn nicht weiter?... Aber er red’t ja...
»... hat heut’ nacht um zwölf der Schlag getroffen.«
»Was?«... Ich darf nicht so schreien... nein, ich darf mir nichts anmerken lassen... aber vielleicht träum’ ich... ich muß ihn noch einmal fragen... »Wen hat der Schlag getroffen?« – Famos, famos! – Ganz harmlos hab’ ich das gesagt! –
»Den Bäckermeister, Herr Leutnant!.. Herr Leutnant werd’n ihn ja kennen... na, den Dicken, der jeden Nachmittag neben die Herren Offiziere seine Tarockpartie hat... mit’n Herrn Schlesinger und’n Herrn Wasner von der Kunstblumenhandlung vis-à-vis!«
Ich bin ganz wach – stimmt alles – und doch kann ich’s noch nicht recht glauben – ich muß ihn noch einmal fragen... aber ganz harmlos...
»Der Schlag hat ihn getroffen?... Ja, wieso denn? Woher wissen S’ denn das?«
»Aber Herr Leutnant, wer soll’s denn früher wissen, als unsereiner – die Semmel, die der Herr Leutnant da essen, ist ja auch vom Herrn Habetswallner. Der Bub, der uns das Gebäck um halber fünfe in der Früh bringt, hat’s uns erzählt.«
Um Himmelswillen, ich darf mich nicht verraten... ich möcht’ ja schreien... ich möcht’ ja lachen... ich möcht’ ja dem Rudolf ein Bussel geben... Aber ich muß ihn noch was fragen!... Vom Schlag getroffen werden, heißt noch nicht: tot sein... ich muß fragen, ob er tot ist... aber ganz ruhig, denn was geht mich der Bäckermeister an – ich muß in die Zeitung schau’n, während ich den Kellner frag’...
»Ist er tot?«
»Na, freilich, Herr Leutnant; auf’m Fleck ist er tot geblieben.« O, herrlich, herrlich! – Am End’ ist das alles, weil ich in der Kirchen g’wesen bin...
»Er ist am Abend im Theater g’wesen; auf der Stiegen ist er umg’fallen – der Hausmeister hat den Krach gehört... na, und dann haben s’ ihn in die Wohnung getragen, und wie der Doktor gekommen ist, war’s schon lang’ aus.«
»Ist aber traurig. Er war doch noch in den besten Jahren.« – Das hab’ ich jetzt famos gesagt – kein Mensch könnt’ mir was anmerken... und ich muß mich wirklich zurückhalten, daß ich nicht schrei’ oder aufs Billard spring’...
»Ja, Herr Leutnant, sehr traurig; war ein so lieber Herr, und zwanzig Jahr’ ist er schon zu uns kommen – war ein guter Freund von unserm Herrn. Und die arme Frau...«
Ich glaub’, so froh bin ich in meinem ganzen Leben nicht gewesen... Tot ist er – tot ist er! Keiner weiß was, und nichts ist g’scheh’n! – Und das Mordsglück, daß ich in das Kaffeehaus gegangen bin... sonst hätt’ ich mich ja ganz umsonst erschossen – es ist doch wie eine Fügung des Schicksals... Wo ist denn der Rudolf? – Ah, mit dem Feuerburschen red’t er... – Also, tot ist er – tot ist er – ich kann’s noch gar nicht glauben! Am liebsten möcht’ ich hingeh’n, um’s zu seh’n. – – Am End’ hat ihn der Schlag getroffen aus Wut, aus verhaltenem Zorn... Ah, warum, ist mir ganz egal! Die Hauptsach’ ist: er ist tot, und ich darf leben, und alles g’hört wieder mein!... Komisch, wie ich mir da immerfort die Semmel einbrock’, die mir der Herr Habetswallner gebacken hat! Schmeckt mir ganz gut, Herr von Habetswallner! Famos! – So, jetzt möcht’ ich noch ein Zigarrl rauchen...
»Rudolf! Sie, Rudolf! Sie, lassen S’ mir den Feuerburschen dort in Ruh’!«
»Bitte, Herr Leutnant!«
»Trabucco«... – Ich bin so froh, so froh!... Was mach’ ich denn nur?... Was mach ich denn nur?... Es muß ja was gescheh’n, sonst trifft mich auch noch der Schlag vor lauter Freud’!... In einer Viertelstund’ geh’ ich hinüber in die Kasern’ und laß mich vom Johann kalt abreiben... um halb acht sind die Gewehrgriff, und um halb zehn ist Exerzieren. – Und der Steffi schreib’ ich, sie muß sich für heut’ abend frei machen, und wenn’s Graz gilt! Und nachmittag um vier... na wart’, mein Lieber, wart’, mein Lieber! Ich bin grad gut aufgelegt... Dich hau’ ich zu Krenfleisch!


Lieutenant Gustl - Kindle version
Lieutenant Gustl - ePub version

Footnotes

[1written more than twenty years before James Joyce rendered the "stream-of-consciousness" technique celebrated in the Anglo-Saxon world with Molly Bloom’s meditations in Ulysses (1924).

[2by declaring war on Serbia on July 28, 1914, three days before Germany declared war on Russia on August 1, 1914.

[3by Ray.

[4cover artwork: "Russian Prisoner of War" by Egon Schiele (1916).